Tag: Warren Commission

Breach of Trust

RIP: Gerald McKnight, Historian Who Dismantled the Warren Commission

Brescj pf Trist

Gerald D. McKnight, historian and author one of the very best scholarly books about the assassination of President Kennedy, died Lawrence, Kansas, on 30th January, 2021.

McKnight, a tenured professor of history at Hood College in Maryland, was the author of Breach of Trust, which explained how the Warren Commission, which was supposed to investigate JFK’s assassination, failed to find the truth–and why.

My friend journalist and historian, David Talbot, said it best:

RIP Vincent Salandria, Leading Warren Commission Critic

From the Truth and Reconciliation Committee

The writings of Vincent J Salandria on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy are historic, foundational, and essential to any serious scholar interested in understanding the real dynamics of the Kennedy murder and its place as a terrible and pivotal moment of the American Century. In his 1967 book Six Seconds in Dallas, Josiah Thompson notes that what he terms the “second generation” of assassination researchers—including Mark Lane, Edward J. Epstein, Harold Weisberg, Raymond Marcus, Léo Sauvage, Richard Popkin—owe “a deep debt to Salandria’s pioneering and largely unsung research.” Thompson is accurate, since Salandria is in the front rank of Warren Commission critics, and the prescience of his analysis is an instruction to all interested people.

Source: FAREWELL TO THE “FIRST RESEARCHER” 

12) 21 JFK cops who heard a grassy knoll shot

Grassy knoll aftermath
A cop runs toward the grassy knoll on November 22.

Strange but true:

At least two dozen, and perhaps as many as four dozen, of the witnesses to the assassination of President Kennedy in November 1963 thought at least one gunshot came from in front of the presidential motorcade.

Dec. 16, 1963: Behind closed doors, the Warren Commission is baffled

With the FBI’s report on Kennedy’s assassination, the Commission undertook to select staffers and figure out how to approach its work.

Chief Justice Warren complained about the leaks of the FBI report:  “I have read that report two or three times and I have not seen anything in there that has not been in the press.”

The Commissioners then held a wide-ranging discussion of JFK’s assasination, including:

The Sixth Floor Museum to hold assassination debate on October 29

Sixth Floor Museum
Home of the Sixth Floor Museum

In a welcome development, the Sixth Floor Museum is holding a debate about the causes of JFK’s assassination on October 29. Long reluctant to engage with critics of the official story, the Dallas museum is opening itself to new points of view.

I suspect curator Stephen Fagin is responsible. I did an oral history of my JFK journalism for the Museum, and I found him to be a perceptive questioner who was interested in different interpretations of November 22.

The two participants in the Oct 29 could not be more qualified to represent their views. …

Did Castro figure out the JFK case in just five days?

Under the suggestive title “Castro Figured Out The JFK Case in Five Days”, an English version of his speech at the University of Havana on November 27, 1963, is available from CTKA.

In due course, the Warren Commission was provided with a slightly different version, but its members feared and rejected Castro’s line of argument depicting JFK’s assassination as part of a broader “plan against peace, against Cuba, against the Soviet Union, against humanity, against progressive and even liberal sectors of the United States.”

Is the CIA’s chief historian obstructing justice in the JFK case?

CIA lobbyPresident Trump will soon announce his decision on whether the last of the U.S. government’s JFK files will be fully released or not. April 26 will be a moment to assess what we know about JFK’s assassination that we didn’t know before, and specifically, what have we learned about the CIA’s role in the events of November 1963.

Among those vouching for the probity of the CIA in the JFK assassination story is the agency’s chief historian David Robarge.

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