Some Thoughts on the JFK Anniversary

James Angleton

I’d never heard of Tommy Carrigan, an enthusiastic podcaster with a taste for military and intelligence books, before he invited me on his show to talk about THE GHOST, my biography of James Angleton, chief of CIA counterintelligence.

We spoke on the day after the 57th anniversary of the assassination of the President John F. Kennedy, and naturally the JFK story came up.

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Will Joe Biden Release the JFK Assassination Records?

Grassy knoll aftermath
A Dallas police officer runs toward the so-called grassy knoll area moments after President Kennedy was shot.

You will recall that President Trump caved to CIA director Mike Pompeo and FBI director Christopher Wray in October 2017. The two agencies were allowed to drop a veil of bizarre and suspicious secrecy over the full record of JFK’s assassination.

The clock is ticking, notes Brendan Cole in Newsweek. Will President Biden do the right thing?

In a presidential memo, Trump said the move was “to protect against identifiable harm to national security, law enforcement, or foreign affairs.” According to the National Archives, some 15,834 of the files still contain redactions and 520 remain unreleased in full.In April 2018, it said that a decision about the material must be reviewed again before October 26, 2021 “to determine whether continued withholding from disclosure is necessary.” This means that their fate will fall within the purview of the incoming administration of President-elect Joe Biden.

Source: Will Joe Biden Release JFK Assassination Records?

Unsung JFK Hero: Abe Bolden

I am remiss in not posting this sooner.

This Facebook page is factually sound. #AbrahamBolden was one of the few U.S. government employees who responded professionally to the assassination of JFK. For his service, he was slandered. It’s time for justice for #AbrahamBolden.

RIP Vincent Salandria, Leading Warren Commission Critic

From the Truth and Reconciliation Committee

The writings of Vincent J Salandria on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy are historic, foundational, and essential to any serious scholar interested in understanding the real dynamics of the Kennedy murder and its place as a terrible and pivotal moment of the American Century. In his 1967 book Six Seconds in Dallas, Josiah Thompson notes that what he terms the “second generation” of assassination researchers—including Mark Lane, Edward J. Epstein, Harold Weisberg, Raymond Marcus, Léo Sauvage, Richard Popkin—owe “a deep debt to Salandria’s pioneering and largely unsung research.” Thompson is accurate, since Salandria is in the front rank of Warren Commission critics, and the prescience of his analysis is an instruction to all interested people.

Source: FAREWELL TO THE “FIRST RESEARCHER” 

NHK Prime on Oswald and the CIA, Part II

Lee Harvey Oswald,
Lee Harvey Oswald, Marine and defector

Several readers noted that the link to Part II of NHK Prime’s documentary on Oswald and the CIA didn’t work. Sorry about that. Here it is. Part II .

And a note for readers who like to comment on JFK Facts.

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Japan’s NHK TV: Oswald in the Eyes of the CIA

Along with Rolf Mowatt-Larsen, John Newman and Dick Russell, I was interviewed extensively for this two-part show on NHK Prime, a prime-time magazine show on Japan’s public television network.

Here’s how NHK presents its latest JFK story.

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The New York Times Evades Bob Dylan’s JFK Challenge

“Bob Dylan Has a Lot on His Mind,” the New York Times reported on June 12.  That’s for sure. In late March, as the COVID-19 pandemic shut down America, the 79 year old singer-songwriter released “Murder Most Foul,” an epic, 17-minute song-poem about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

Since “Who killed JFK?” is one of the central questions of American history, you might think that the Times interviewer, historian Douglas Brinkley would ask the Nobel laureate about how he came to compose his dark and brooding take on November 22, 1963. You might think Brinkley, a CNN commentator, would ask Dylan why he decided to release the song as the country and the world reeled from a plague.

You might think wrong.

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What were JFK’s two greatest speeches?


President Kennedy gave two speeches, on June 10 and June 11, 1963 that changed the course of American history, says  historian Andrew Cohen, author of “Two Days in June.” Cohen explained what JFK wrought in a recent interview with CBC TV host Peter Mansbridge.

 

June 10, 1963: A profile in courage with lethal consequences


President Kennedy’s speech to the graduating class of American University in Washington DC on June 10, 1963, represented the beginning of his “strategy for peace”  to wind down the Cold War. His bold proposal for a joint U.S.-Soviet moon flight was part of this strategy.

Kennedy’s vigorous style and clear mind never had a more important goal — or more powerful enemies.

JFK,  Dylan, and the Death of the American Dream 

In these terrible days, I got to thinking about Tim Shorrock’s essay/review on Bob Dylan’s JFK opus:

At its most essential level, “Murder Most Foul” marks the collapse of the American dream, dating from that terrible day in Dallas, when a certain evil in our midst was revealed in ways not seen for a hundred years—a day that, for Dylan, myself, and others of our generation is forever seared into our collective memory.

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Murder on the Towpath: Soledad O’Brien’s Podcast on Mary Meyer

Mary Pinchot Meyer
Mary Pinchot Meyer, painter.

I’ll be tuning into this re-examination of the Mary Meyer case, not for the conspiracy theories (which I don’t find convincing) but for the details of the case that emerged at the trial of her alleged (and acquitted) assailant.

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JFK on Memorial Day: a Memoir

Green Beret on JFK’s grave (Credit: Louis Jarvis)

These memories of Memorial Day come from reader, Louis Jarvis.

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Digitizing the JFK Bullet Evidence

A fascinating explanation of how the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) created digital imagery of the bullet evidence in the assassination of JFK.

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Coming: ‘Last Second in Dallas,’ by Josiah Thompson 

Josiah Thompson was headed for a dull career as a college philosophy professor when he took an interest in the assassination of JFK.

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Understanding the Forensic Evidence and Witness Testimony

JFK in living color

At Medium, Jimmy Falls (also of WhoWhatWhy) breaks down the forensic and eyewitness testimony to JFK’s assassination with a focus on the testimony of three people-John and Nellie Connally and James Tague–who experienced the hail of gunfire that killed the president.

The presentation is careful, the conclusions inescapable.

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