Tag Archive for Warren Commission

Is ‘The Truth About Dallas’ credible?

As the JFK critical literature continues to grow, we would like to lay out one last time how we arrived at our conclusions, and why we are as confident as ever about what happened during those fateful days in Texas.

With those words, former Warren Commission staffers Howard Willens and Richard Mosk restated the case for why Americans should believe the official theory of JFK’s death.

I invite readers to comment on the findings of Willens and Mosk (which appear in the summer issue of the American Scholar) and why young people should believe them or not.

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Allen Dulles and the aftermath of JFK’s assassination.

Devil's ChessboardIn an wide-ranging interview with the German publication, Heise, David Talbot talks about his biography of CIA director Allen Dulles, “The Devil’s Chessboard,” which has just been published in German.

Q. Among the most incredible aspects of the Kennedy assassination is the fact that Dulles and his friends were called to investigate in the Warren Commission (1963), as well as Rockefeller Commission (1975). Was Dulles correct in his assessment, that the American people do not read?

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Did Castro figure out the JFK case in just five days?

Under the suggestive title “Castro Figured Out The JFK Case in Five Days”, an English version of his speech at the University of Havana on November 27, 1963, is available from CTKA. In due course, the Warren Commission was provided with a slightly different version (CE 2954), but its members feared Castro’s line of argument depicting JFK’s assassination as part of a broader “plan against peace, against Cuba, against the Soviet Union, against humanity, against progressive and even liberal sectors of the United States.”

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▶ Listen: Oswald talks about Cuba

From JFK Lancer, a recording of radio program broadcast by WDSU radio in New Orleans on August 20, 1963.

▶ Lee H. Oswald debates the Cuba issue with anti-communist activist Ed Butler, and anti-Castro militant Carlos Bringuier of Cuban Student Directorate (DRE)

Bringuier is an important witness, and the CIA-sponsored DRE, is significant. But recently it is Butler’s role in this debate that holds my interest. Read more

21 JFK cops who heard a grassy knoll shot

Grassy knoll aftermath

A cop runs toward the grassy knoll on November 22.

Strange but true:

At least two dozen, and perhaps as many as four dozen, of the witnesses to the assassination of President Kennedy in November 1963 thought at least one gunshot came from in front of the presidential motorcade, a claim rejected by the Warren Commission and most U.S. news organizations..

Richard Charnin has proposed a statistical proof of a shot from the front.

Another way to think about the matter is to review the eyewitness accounts, especially those of people with crime scene training.

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Richard M. Mosk, Warren Commission staffer 

Richard M. Mosk dies at 76; California Court of Appeal justice and Warren Commission staffer – LA Times Read more

Who did Jackie Kennedy think killed her husband?

Jackie Kennedy’s private thoughts about Dallas

A few things are known for sure. First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, 34 years old and dressed in a U.S.-made knock off of a pink Chanel suit, was looking at her husband’s face with concern from inches away when a bullet shattered his head.

After that horrible moment, Jackie had to pull herself together, give Jack the funeral he deserved. She assumed that her husband’s enemies had killed him. A week after the assassination, she and her brother-in-law Robert Kennedy confided in a friend, William Walton. They said they believed Dallas was the work of a high-level domestic plot, meaning JFK’s enemies on the political right.

But mostly Jackie didn’t want to think about who killed Jack. She was close to insane with grief, clutching to her brother-in-law who was devastated as well. She was often suicidal. And so Jackie fades from the crime story. The men who dominate the discussions of JFK conspiracy theories are often united in ignoring the views of the woman closest to the crime.

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Sen. Richard Russell, the first dissenter

 Speaking of “Six insiders who suspected a JFK plot,”

Len Osanic’s Black Op Radio drills down on the story of Insider #4, Georgia Senator Richard Russell, a conservative defender of racial segregation and a member of the Warren Commission.

Russell’s biographer dubbed him “the first dissenter” in the  JFK assassination story.


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Why did James Angleton want to wait out the Warren Commission?

The short answer is I don’t know.

The long answer is that we are talking about one of the most pregnant moments in the Warren Commission’s efforts to obtain information from the CIA. It happened in March 1964. Read more

Comment of the week

Tom Scully – January 11

Let’s see if I have this right, Ed Butler is in Hale Bogg’s office in the capitol playing the Oswald radio debate tape before AF-1 unloads JFK’s Dallas casket. See: http://jfkfacts.org/assassination/comment-of-the-week-10/#comment-847322 Read more

Untold JFK story: the FBI’s pre-assassination hunt for Lee Harvey Oswald

On September 27 and 28, 1963, a man calling himself Lee Oswald visited the Cuban consulate and Soviet embassy in Mexico City. He was seeking visas to visit both countries.  As Oswald was a former defector to the Soviet Union who was planning on traveling with his Russian-born wife, he immediately attracted the interest of CIA officers and FBI agents in the Mexican capital.

And so the FBI began searching for Oswald–while President Kennedy was still alive, a story that was withheld from the Warren Commission and is ignored in virtually every book about JFK’s assassination.

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Listen in on LBJ and Hoover talk about Warren Commission

Audio flashback: On November 29, 1963, President Lyndon Johnson and FBI Director J Edgar Hoover discussed how to investigate the mysterious assassination of President Kennedy. (H/T DVP and

Readers weigh in: JFK video you should watch: Gerald McKnight

JD recommends Episode 33 from Black Op Radio’s series “50 Reasons for 50 Years,” in which Professor Gerald D. McKnight discusses the Warren Commission’s reaction to the rumor that Oswald was an FBI informant.

The curious story of Oswald’s radio

What this Buzzfeed story confirms is a singular fact rarely discussed in the annals of U.S. intelligence: the CIA did not conduct a counterespionage investigation of an accused president assassin.

Police went to the rooming house and seized everything in his room, including the radio. They gave the radio to the FBI, and then it went to NSA.

Source: Oswald’s Radio?

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Hardway on Dulles, RFK and the creation of the Warren Commission

Dan Hardway

Dan Hardway

In response to Phil Shenon’s article on the CIA’s JFK cover-up in Politico magazine, David Talbot disputed the claim that Robert Kennedy was responsible for Allen Dulles being on the Warren Commission.

Shenon responded in a letter to JFK Facts on October 14.

I would like to point out a couple of additional reasons to reject the idea of RFK being behind Dulles’ appointment to the Warren Commission.

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