Tag Archive for Warren Commission

Readers weigh in: JFK video you should watch: Gerald McKnight

JD recommends Episode 33 from Black Op Radio’s series “50 Reasons for 50 Years,” in which Professor Gerald D. McKnight discusses the Warren Commission’s reaction to the rumor that Oswald was an FBI informant.

The curious story of Oswald’s radio

What this Buzzfeed story confirms is a singular fact rarely discussed in the annals of U.S. intelligence: the CIA did not conduct a counterespionage investigation of an accused president assassin.

Police went to the rooming house and seized everything in his room, including the radio. They gave the radio to the FBI, and then it went to NSA.

Source: Oswald’s Radio?

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Listen in on LBJ and Hoover talk about Warren Commission

Audio flashback: On November 29, 1963, President Lyndon Johnson and FBI Director J Edgar Hoover discussed how to investigate the mysterious assassination of President Kennedy. (H/T DVP and

Hardway on Dulles, RFK and the creation of the Warren Commission

Dan Hardway

Dan Hardway

In response to Phil Shenon’s article on the CIA’s JFK cover-up in Politico magazine, David Talbot disputed the claim that Robert Kennedy was responsible for Allen Dulles being on the Warren Commission.

Shenon responded in a letter to JFK Facts on October 14.

I would like to point out a couple of additional reasons to reject the idea of RFK being behind Dulles’ appointment to the Warren Commission.

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Allen Dulles and the making of the Warren Commission

Dan Hardway offers another gem of historic audio to our discussion of how Allen Dulles came to be named to the Warren Commission. He cites this phone call that President Johnson made to Allen Dulles on November 29, 1963, informing him he would be on the Commission.

Listen to the conversation here:

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RFK and Dulles: A closer look at the record

RFK i shadowedPhil Shenon writes:

“I see there’s a suggestion on your site, in response to my POLITICO piece, that Bobby Kennedy would never have recommended Allen Dulles for membership on the Warren Commission. I continue to believe the record shows that RFK did propose Dulles, and not just because LBJ (more than once) said that was the case.

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The Devil’s Chessboard and the new political landscape

By focusing on the one man at the epicenter of both World War II and the Cold War as well as the assassination – Allen Welsh Dulles, Talbot puts his finger on the pulse of power, and without promoting any conspiracy theory in regards to the assassination, he sets the stage for rational discussion and historic acceptance of such theories, for certainly one of them must be true.

Source: JFKcountercoup: The Devil’s Chessboard and the New Political Landscape

The CIA’s JFK assassination story is ‘evolving’

CIA: There Was a JFK Assassination Cover-Up | Maxim

Robarge’s account may give credence to some of the conspiracy theories that have long swirled around JFK’s death:

Let’s say we leave the conspiracy theories out of it for now and stick to the facts, ma’am.

CIA historian David Robarge now speaks of a “benign JFK cover-up” after JFK was killed. The CIA, in this account, wasn’t really sure that the communist Oswald killed the liberal president. They just decided that was the “best truth” they could find at the time. Not the whole truth, mind you, just the best truth.

With some artful spin, the Agency spokesmen are now conceding an important point first made by CIA critics: Read more

The CIA’s modified limited hangout: Politico on the spy chief who lied about JFK

RFK and John McCone

“Did your guys do it?” RFK asked CIA director John McCone after JFK was killed. (photo credit: CIA)


Phil Shenon continues his intrepid reporting on the assassination of JFK with a report in POLITICO Magazine.on the findings of the CIA’s in-house historian that former director John McCone covered up key information from assassination investigators.

The CIA, it turns out, has confirmed that yet another senior agency official–McCone–withheld significant information from  the Warren Commission. The story is accompanied by the agency’s assurances–and Shenon’s–that the Warren Commission’s conclusions about who killed JFK were correct in every respect.

The weakness of this claim should be obvious. If the Warren Commission investigation was compromised from the top by CIA officers–and now even the agency belatedly agrees it was–then confidence in its findings must be reduced. Logically, one cannot impugn the investigation without impugning its findings.

But the CIA is willing to try.

The modified limited hangout

The CIA is now playing defense against the widespread and accurate public perception that it is not being forthcoming about JFK’s assassination. The agency, for example, retains 1,100 JFK assassination records that it may or may not release as mandated by law in October 2017.

Some of these files are potentially explosive. See “7 JFK files the CIA still conceals.”

The CIA’s cooperation with Shenon, along with its release last month of presidential daily briefings from the Kennedy era, are intended to show the public that the agency is being candid, willing to admit mistakes, and so on.

To be sure,the agency’s very limited disclosures are something of a contribution to the record of JFK’s assassination.

A  November 25, 1963, briefing for President Johnson, was revealing. It showed what the CIA wasn’t telling the White House. The agency didn’t care to share just how much senior officers knew about the obscure Lee H. Oswald before President Kennedy was killed.

The Politico story shows that McCone dutifully went along with another aspect of the CIA cover-up. He knew about–but did not tell the Warren Commision about–the CIA’s conspiracies to kill Castro, leader of the communist revolution in Cuba.

So we can now say, without fear of contradiction, that the top three officers of the CIA did not cooperate with the investigation of JFK’s murder.

Deputy director Richard Helms and counterintelligence chief James Angleton took the lead in the CIA cover-up and McCone followed.

The CIA is engaged in what one conspirator in the Watergate era called “the modified limited hangout.” This is the Washington art of disclosing lesser crimes and misdemeanors in service of hiding greater wrongdoing.

Now in 2015

This is a sorry episode in American history that invites–nay, demands–public suspicion.

The Politico story tells us that Director John McCone’s control of the CIA in 1963 was nominal. It confirms that senior CIA officials agreed they should not cooperate with law enforcement efforts to investigate President Kennedy’s murder. And it shows that CIA officials today–52 years later!–feel the need to manage the problem of secrecy around JFK’s assassination. Fifty two years later.

The good news is that when Washington officials with something to hide go into “modified limited hangout” mode, they are usually in trouble, and frequently subject to more embarrassing disclosures.

The bad news is that “perception management,” which is what the CIA is now engaged in, is often successful.

The JFK acid test will come in October 2017. That’s when the CIA is supposed to release those 1,100 documents. As Politico and JFK Facts have reported, those documents could be embarrassing for the agency.

Politico’s mistake

Shenon makes one significant mistake in his piece where he writes:

“Robert Kennedy’s friends and family acknowledged years later that he never stopped fearing that Castro was behind his brother’s death.”

This is not factually supported. From the moment his brother was attacked,  Bobby Kennedy suspected anti-Castro Cubans and/or organized crime figures were responsible.

With hours of the assassination, RFK met personally with McCone. He asked McCone if CIA people were behind his brother’s murder. McCone said no.

A few days later, Bobby and Jackie Kennedy told a friend, William Walton, that they believed JFK was the victim of a domestic, not foreign, conspiracy.

In fact, as David Talbot’s book Brothers, shows in detail Bobby’s conspiratorial suspicions rarely, if ever, settled on JFK’s enemies on the left. Bobby and Jackie asked William Walton to tell high-level contacts in Moscow that, despite Oswald’s leftist politics, they did not hold the Soviet Union responsible for events in Dallas.

In an email, Talbot wrote, “Phil Shenon continues to recycle the myth — long propagated in CIA circles — that Fidel Castro was behind the JFK assassination. He now adds another piece of disinformation, asserting that Robert Kennedy also fell for this CIA propaganda line. This is completely false. I interviewed over 150 close friends, colleagues and family members of Bobby Kennedy, including Kennedy administration officials and insiders, for my book. NONE of them indicated to me that Castro was among Bobby’s leading suspects in the assassination of his brother.”

“Instead, they said that RFK immediately focused on the CIA and its ANTI-Castro operation as the source of the plot against President Kennedy. My sources included close advisors of Bobby Kennedy like Adam Walinsky, Frank Mankiewicz, Ed Guthman, Richard Goodwin — as well as assassination researchers with whom Bobby Kennedy met during his secret search for the truth.”

Which only makes sense. If top CIA officials blocked a full investigation of the murder of a sitting president, they had something to hide. Bobby Kennedy knew that in the 1960s. And, now a half century later, we know that CIA officials still have something to hide: the 1,100 documents scheduled for release in 2017, especially the “7 JFK files the CIA still keeps secret.”











Who did Jackie Kennedy think killed her husband?

Jackie Kennedy’s private thoughts about Dallas

A few things are known for sure. First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, 34 years old and dressed in a U.S.-made knock off of a pink Chanel suit, was looking at her husband’s face with concern from inches away when a bullet shattered his head.

After that horrible moment, Jackie had to pull herself together, give Jack the funeral he deserved. She assumed that her husband’s enemies had killed him. A week after the assassination, she and her brother-in-law Robert Kennedy confided in a friend, William Walton. They said they believed Dallas was the work of a high-level domestic plot, meaning JFK’s enemies on the political right.

But mostly Jackie didn’t want to think about who killed Jack. She was close to insane with grief, clutching to her brother-in-law who was devastated as well. She was often suicidal. And so Jackie fades from the crime story. The men who dominate the discussions of JFK conspiracy theories are often united in ignoring the views of the woman closest to the crime.

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‘Jim [Angleton] would prefer to wait out the Commission …’

“Jim would prefer to wait out the Commission on the matter covered by paragraph 2 …”

CIA’s Raymond Rocca, writing to Richard Helms regarding counterintelligence chief James Angleton’s desire to stonewall the Warren Commission on certain CIA materials passed to the Secret Service.
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The late Richard Schweiker on the Warren Commission

Robert passes along an excerpt of what the late  Senator Richard Schweiker (R-Pennsylvania) said on Face the Nation in 1976. When asked about the Warren Commission report, Schweiker replied:

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Richard Schweiker, Republican critic of JFK assassination probe, dies at 89

Richard S. Schweiker

Sem Richard S. Schweiker, Warren Commission critic (Photo by Archive Photos/Getty Images)


“The evidence the Committee has developed suggests that, for different reasons, both the CIA and the FBI failed in, or avoided carrying out, certain of their responsibilities in this matter,” Schweiker and [Senator Gary] Hart wrote in their study regarding the role of U.S. intelligence agencies in the Warren Commission’s review.”

Source: Richard Schweiker, Critic of JFK Assassination Probe, Dies at 89 – Bloomberg Business

So the Warren Commission files will not be released until 2039. Is that correct?

The question comes from Mark. The answer is, “No, that is not correct.”

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9 things you may not know about the Warren Commission

From the History Channel: 9 Things You May Not Know About the Warren Commission.