Tag Archive for James Angleton

The Assassination & Mrs. Paine 

 

Here’s why: As the CIA’s James Angleton monitored the movements of the ex-defector Lee Oswald in the fall of 1963, Oswald came in contact with the Paines, a family familiar with the CIA milieu.

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James Angleton and the art of leak

Similarly, the late James Angleton, America’s most famous counterspy, slipped me the history of a ridiculously expensive recovery vessel called the Glomar Explorer and a few years later laughed that it was an effort to upstage a New York Times investigative reporter he knew was chasing the story.

Source: The leaks I received during Watergate taught me they’re worth the risk – The Washington Post

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JFK’s differences with the CIA were profound. Trump’s, not yet.

JFK at Dallas AirportFrom the fever swamp of InfoWars, Jerome Corsi reports that “JFK researchers” are saying that President Donald Trump is at risk for assassination because of his differences with the Central Intelligence Agency.

I have been a JFK researcher for 35 years, and Corsi has distorted what most of us think to serve a fear-mongering political agenda.

“JFK researchers: Trump at risk for assassination” is a lousy piece of journalism, less of a story than a conspiratorial meme but it is revealing about Trump and the CIA.

Corsi’s right about one thing: Trump faces an important JFK decision later this year.

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Returning to action: the JFK story in 2017

My vacation from the land of JFK is over. I haven’t written here in a couple of months and now I’m back. Please excuse my unauthorized absence. I’ve been busy.

I’m writing about the Trump administration for AlterNet, and that’s a yuge job.

I finished my next book, The Ghost: The Secret Life of CIA Spymaster James Jesus Angleton, and that was bigly too. (Look for this biographic thriller on Amazon/Powell’s and in bookstores in October.)

But I’d left some people high and dry. My friend Dwight said, Man, what’s up with the blog? Don’t stop now. So, with lots of JFK news coming, it is indeed time to start writing again.

You will be hearing from me on many things, including:

  • Judge John Tunheim’s March 16 appearance in Washington to talk about the JFK Records Act;
  • The latest from the National Archives on the JFK records in October 2017;
  • The implications of tensions between President Trump and the CIA for full JFK disclosure;
  • Why Natalie Portman was robbed at the Oscars.

I was talking with John Newman the other day–about Angleton, the JFK Records Act, and Cuba–and he said, “I truly think we are in new territory in terms of understanding the case.”

I think that’s right. The challenge of 2017 is to tell the new JFK story in a lucid dispassionate way.

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Spirit of Angleton hovers over an attack on Edward Snowden

From the New York Times Book Review:

The spirit of James Jesus Angleton, the C.I.A.’s mole-obsessed counterintelligence chief during the peak years of the Cold War and evidently a mentor to Epstein (he’s mentioned several times), hovers over these pages.

That’s reviewer Nicholas Lemman’s way of casting doubt on Edward Epstein’s lightly sourced (to put it mildly) indictment of the NSA whistle blower. In other words, Epstein’s case against Snowden as a spy today is as unsuccessful as Angleton’s hunt for a Soviet mole in the 1960s.

My biography of Angleton, The Ghost, will be published in the fall of 2017. It can be preordered now.

Source: Is Edward Snowden a Spy? A New Book Calls Him One. – The New York Times

‘Jim [Angleton] would prefer to wait out the Commission …’

The reason James Angleton’s still-secret testimony to the Church Committee matters in 2017 is found in this Warren Commission document.

“Jim would prefer to wait out the Commission on the matter covered by paragraph 2 …”

CIA’s Raymond Rocca, writing to Richard Helms regarding counterintelligence chief James Angleton’s desire to stonewall the Warren Commission on certain CIA materials passed to the Secret Service.
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Secret JFK document #2: James Angleton’s testimony

Angleton thoughtful

Counterintelligence chief James Angleton

On January 22, 1976. retired CIA counterintelligence chief James Angleton testified in secret session with the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Activities, otherwise known as the Church Committee.

Forty two years later, the 74 page transcript of Angleton’s testimony is still a state secret, according to the Mary Ferrell Foundation’s comprehensive listing of still-classified JFK material.

Angleton’s testimony, scheduled to be released in October of this year, could not be more important to JFK assassination scholarship.

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Literary (CIA) agents at work

In Literary Agents, Patrick Iber of the New Republic delves into the role of the CIA in the culture Cold War. He doesn’t specifically mention the role of Cord Meyer and James Angleton but they were probably the two CIA officials most responsible for CIA cultural funding between 1954 and 1967,

Iber captures what was most problematic about the CIA’s role, something I will touch on in my forthcoming Angleton biography.

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The Dulles ascendancy: the rise of a secret government 

Allen’s ascendency brought furtive characters, such as gun-toting William Harvey and cadaverous James Jesus Angelton, into a powerful global apparatus. Cold War ideology brooked no nationalist aspirations in any country wishing to control domestic politics and natural resources. A post-colonial era was emerging. But democratically elected nationalist leaders such as Mohammad Mossadegh in Iran and Jacobo Arbenz in Guatemala were conveniently portrayed as communists. In both countries, the CIA orchestrated coups ensuring protection for profitable corporate oil interests and the United Fruit Co. The agency contributed to the killing of Patrice Lumumba, the charismatic Congolese leader who only wanted self-government for his beleaguered people.

Source: The mid-20th-century rise of a secret government | Street Roots

Attention CIA: the whole world expects full JFK disclosure

Time Magazine Year Ahead Thanks to the Internet, the media is finally paying attention.

Three days ago, it was Macleans, the Canadian newsweekly, which ran an article about the impending release of thousands of secret JFK records in October 2016. Today it is Time magazine, which reports

The tortured path that began with a left turn onto Dealey Plaza on Nov. 22, 1963, will find its unlikely end point this October in College Park, Md. At a National Archives annex, the last remaining documents related to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy are being processed, scanned and readied for release.

In 2015, it was Politico which explained “Why the last of the JFK files could embarrass CIA.” In 2013 it was Associated Press that reported, “5 decades later, me JFK probe files still sealed.”

The story is out there. It is undisputed. And it has nothing to do with the stupid JFK conspiracy theories peddled by hucksters like Alex Jones.

Thanks to the Mary Ferrell Foundation and WhoWhatWhy, anybody who wants to know can see a listing of all the JFK records that are supposed to be released on or before October 26, 2017. Read more

Another gift idea: the JFK story as seen by a top CIA officer

As a former longtime employee of CIA, I can attest that this book conveys a true picture of the goings on within the agency.”

— From Martha Hanchulak’s review of “Our Man in Mexico: Winston Scott and the Hidden History of the CIA.” My first book describes in lucid detail how the CIA’s top man in Mexico viewed President Kennedy’s assassination in 1963: with deep suspicion.

It reads like a novel but every word is true. Available now on Amazon.comRead more

The RealClearPolitics polemic on Castro and JFK

The death of Fidel Castro continues to revive memories of and debate about JFK’s assassination.

This RealClearPolitics take on Castro and the Kennedy Assassination falters when author James Piereson asserts

Oswald’s motives in shooting President Kennedy were almost certainly linked to his desire to block Kennedy’s campaign to assassinate Castro or to overthrow his government.

There is little evidence to support this claim.

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Under CIA eyes: How Israel stole nuclear material from the United States

The non-profit National Security Archive in Washington has new details on the NUMEC Affair: how Israel defied President Kennedy’s non-proliferation policies to steal U.S.-made fissile material and build a nuclear arsenal in the 1960s.  Read more

‘The Good Shepherd’: Angleton on screen


Robert DeNiro’s 2006 movie, “The Good Shepherd,” is one of the best films about the early days of the CIA, with Matt Damon playing a character loosely based on James Angleton. Joe Pesci has a brilliant cameo as mobster Meyer Lansky.

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The house that Angleton built

Angleton home

Boyhood home of James Jesus Angleton.

This is the house on Washington Street in Boise Idaho where James Angleton lived when he was a boy. From such a modest start, Angleton went on to become one of the most powerful men in the U.S. government during the Cold War.

I have just finished writing the first true biography of Angleton, to be published next year by St. Martin’s Press. It is not only the story of the man but of the secret empire he built within the CIA.

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