Tag: Secrecy

What did we learn from the 2017 JFK releases?

“There’s a lot of noise around the Kennedy assassination,” I observe in the JFK Facts Podcast #2. With host Alan Dale, I try to cut though that noise and talk about what we learned about the assassination from the last round of JFK releases in 2017 and 2018?

Spoiler alert: one thing we learned about was the surveillance of Lee Harvey Oswald.

To download the podcast as an MP3: Click HERE Place cursor on file; RIGHT click and select “Save Audio As.”

Bill Burns CIA

What will Biden do about the last of the JFK files?

Come October 26, 2021, President BIden is going to have to make a decision about the last of the U.S. government’s secret JFK files. There’s more than 15,000 of them. Accompanied by jazz drummer, Alan Dale, host of the JFK Facts podcast, I explain what’s going to happen and when.

To download the podcast as an MP3: Click HERE Place cursor on file; RIGHT click and select “Save Audio As.”

Read the transcript.

Available on Kindle: Morley v. CIA: My Unfinished JFK Investigation

Morley v. CIA
(l. to r.) USA Today reporter Ed Bracken attorney James Lesar, and plaintiff Jefferson Morley

In 2003 I sued the Central Intelligence Agency with the help of Washington D.C. attorney James Lesar. Under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), We sought public release of the files of a deceased undercover officer who was involved in the events leading to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

In the new Kindle ebook, Morley v. CIA: My Unfinished JFK Investigation, I tell the story of the epic 16-year legal saga that followed. It’s a brisk read, funny, disturbing and revealing about where the rest of the JFK assassination story is hidden: in the CIA’s archives.

The hero of the story is Lesar, a dogged litigator taking on high-powered Justice Department lawyers. The villain is a judge named Brett Kavanaugh.

Read more here

Will Joe Biden Release the JFK Assassination Records?

Grassy knoll aftermath
A Dallas police officer runs toward the so-called grassy knoll area moments after President Kennedy was shot.

You will recall that President Trump caved to CIA director Mike Pompeo and FBI director Christopher Wray in October 2017. The two agencies were allowed to drop a veil of bizarre and suspicious secrecy over the full record of JFK’s assassination.

The clock is ticking, notes Brendan Cole in Newsweek. Will President Biden do the right thing?

In a presidential memo, Trump said the move was “to protect against identifiable harm to national security, law enforcement, or foreign affairs.” According to the National Archives, some 15,834 of the files still contain redactions and 520 remain unreleased in full.In April 2018, it said that a decision about the material must be reviewed again before October 26, 2021 “to determine whether continued withholding from disclosure is necessary.” This means that their fate will fall within the purview of the incoming administration of President-elect Joe Biden.

Source: Will Joe Biden Release JFK Assassination Records?

4) Official Pentagon history: Top generals resisted JFK’s peace policies in 1963

Michael Swanson, an investment adviser turned JFK researcher, called my attention to “Council of War,” a fascinating official history of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The study documents the Pentagon’s resistance to, and resentment of, President Kennedy’s foreign policy, especially on Cuba and Vietnam.

New JFK documents fill in some blanks and leave many others

The latest release of JFK files includes more than 15,000 documents that still have redactions. What is the CIA still hiding?

“The past 25 years have taught us much more about the cover up than the crime itself, in particular the ways in which scary but false information about Lee Harvey Oswald created what might be termed a national security cover up,” said Rex Bradford, president of the Mary Ferrell Foundation, which runs a searchable online archive of JFK assassination documents.

Source: New JFK docs fill in blanks on events around assassination | McClatchy Washington Bureau

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