Tag Archive for Dealey Plaza

How many Dealey Plaza witnesses said they heard shots from multiple locations?

Where did the shots come from?Mike from California asks a pertinent question:

“How many witnesses [of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy] said they heard shots from multiple locations?”

There are couple of different ways to answer that question.

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Trailer of ‘Plaza Man,’ on JFK crusader Robert Groden


Barto sends word:

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Robert Groden: his JFK life depicted in Dutch documentary

And here is the real fascination of this film. It’s just not that simple. It’s not as easy as dismissing Robert Groden as a nutcase. He’s weird. He’s way unusual. He’s obsessive as hell. But how do we know — Do we know? — that obsession is automatically or always wrong or destructive? What if he’s right?

From Dallas Observer: Dutch Documentary Portrays Dallas Conspiracy Guy  Read more

Jean Hill and the reliability of eyewitness testimony


Jean Hill saw JFK’s assassination up close. A few hours later, she told a Dallas TV interviewer what she saw. Her account is notable for its errors, illustrating the problem with eyewitness testimony in the JFK assassination story. Read more

Max Holland responds to Myers and Vaughan about Dealey Plaza

I asked Max Holland if he wanted to respond to the critique of his recent 6th Floor Museum presentation made by Dale K Myers and Todd W. Vaughan. Holland replied:

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What did Dealey Plaza witnesses say about the origins of the gunfire that killed JFK?

Here’s the most comprehensive compilation of eyewitness testimony from the Dealey Plaza crime scene, courtesy of Stewart Galanor and the Mary Farrell Foundation.

Dallas police to Groden: ‘Grassy knoll’ banner must go

The latest antics of the Dallas police, courtesy of the Dallas ObserverDallas Wants JFK Conspiracy Theorist to Remove “Grassy Knoll” Sign.

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What did the doctor who examined JFK’s head wound say?


Dr. Robert McClelland stood at head of the gurney as the Parkland doctors attempted to save President Kennedy’s life. There is no more credible witness about the nature of JFK’s head wound.

Where did the gunshot that killed JFK come from?

Grassy Knoll 11/22/63

This photograph, courtesy of Duncan MacDonald, taken several minutes after President Kennedy was shot to death, shows a crowd of people, including newsman Robert MacNeil (later host of MacNeil-Lehrer Newshour), rushing to look at the railroad tracks and parking lot overlooking the motorcade route on November 22, 1963.

There is no disputing that they rushed to that area, known as “the grassy knoll,” because they thought one of the gunshots had come from there. No gunman was ever found there.

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Jackie Kennedy’s ordeal: PTSD before there was PTSD

Barbara Leaming, biographer of Jackie Kennedy, on the First Lady’s  ordeal after her husband was killed by her side. Read more

The origins of Mannlicher-Carcano bullets

Mannlicher Carcano, JFK, rifle

Where did the bullets come from?

An intriguing tidbit from a faithful reader about the bullet that allegedly killed President Kennedy.

“Recently, I was reading the post CSI JFK: The Chain of Custody for “the magic bullet.” Bob Prudhomme posted a reference to “frangible range bullet for the Mannlicher-Carcano.” I didn’t know what that meant. I had to look it up. In doing so, I stumbled across a Web site about the ammunition (not the rifle).
Scroll down to the heading- “Non-Italian Military Rounds.”
It says:

Grassy knoll target practice on 11.20.63?

Reader David Regan asks if anyone has information regarding the story below, in which the Dallas police allegedly encountered a group of men engaging in “target practice” on the Grassy Knoll on November 20, 1963: Has anyone come across confirmation on this? “Target Practice in Dealey Plaza” — from “Mafia Kingfish,” by John Davis (paperback Signet Books edition, 1989):

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Who did Jackie Kennedy think killed her husband?

Jackie Kennedy’s private thoughts about Dallas

A few things are known for sure. First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, 34 years old and dressed in a U.S.-made knock off of a pink Chanel suit, was looking at her husband’s face with concern from inches away when a bullet shattered his head.

After that horrible moment, Jackie had to pull herself together, give Jack the funeral he deserved. She assumed that her husband’s enemies had killed him. A week after the assassination, she and her brother-in-law Robert Kennedy confided in a friend, William Walton. They said they believed Dallas was the work of a high-level domestic plot, meaning JFK’s enemies on the political right.

But mostly Jackie didn’t want to think about who killed Jack. She was close to insane with grief, clutching to her brother-in-law who was devastated as well. She was often suicidal. And so Jackie fades from the crime story. The men who dominate the discussions of JFK conspiracy theories are often united in ignoring the views of the woman closest to the crime.

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Four photographers remember November 22

Four young photographers working for the daily newspaper Dallas Times Herald in 1963 were assigned to the team tasked with capturing the President’s much-anticipated visit to Dallas. They’ll be talking about their memories of that day on Tuesday, November 17 at 7 pm at The Sixth Floor Museum in Dallas.

Tickets are $25.

 

Could the Secret Service have saved JFK?

Former agent Abraham Bolden thinks so. Here’s what he told Susan Cheever in the current issue of Vanity Fair:

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