Attacking Trump’s JFK theories, the New York Times neglects the facts

The disturbing shadow of John F. Kennedy’s assassination remains visible in American politics and journalism.

Witness the appearance of Roger Stone, adviser to Donald Trump, at a symposium on Lee Harvey Oswald in New Orleans, which drew the attention of the New York Times (and the pro-Clinton attack group Media Matters.)

“At a time when talk of having lost the country is very much in vogue, along with deep suspicions of a powerful and secretive elite, the symposium seemed remarkably of the moment,” writes reporter Campbell Robertson.

Of course, reporting on how fears of secret power are driving the discourse of the 2016 presidential election is an eminently timely and worthy subject. But reporting is what Robertson failed to do. Instead of learning the latest JFK facts, Times readers were served a birthday cake. Read more

Help release the FBI file on Frank Sturgis

One of my favorite JFK Facts stories came from a woman named Monica Jimenez who pulled a gun on Watergate burglar Frank Sturgis when he tried to intimidate her mother, Maritz Lorentz, about her JFK  assassination story. Jimenez. was fifteen years old at the time. The threat suggests Sturgis had something to hide when it came to JFK.

The investigative web site Muckrock has a great follow-up story. It turns out there’s a whole lot more to be learned about Sturgis: namely, an FBI file containing 75,000 documents.

Source: Help release the FBI file on Watergate burglar (and alleged CIA asset) Frank Sturgis


Poisonous secrecy: the roots of Flint’s water crisis

“Flint’s water crisis was not the first in this country and, tragically, without greater sunlight and public scrutiny, it will not be the last,” says OTG.

Read more in the Battle Creek Enquirer about how government secrecy contributed to the Flint crisis, and how transparency measures in its wake have not gone far enough to prevent future disasters.

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JFK Facts podcast: The trouble with conspiracy theories and their critics

Jefferson Morley and Alan Dale discuss Cass Sunstein’s ideas concerning conspiracy theories and conspiracy theorists.

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What Cass Sunstein and the New Yorker get wrong about conspiracy theories

Ezra Klein and Cass Sunstein have some sensible things to say about the disturbing prevalence and power of conspiracy theories  in this Vox video, especially about the toxic combination of conspiracy theories, ignorance, and extremism. So does the New Yorker. But these opinion-makers are wrong–or rather, underinformed–about the JFK story. Read more

The hazards of running a JFK joint in the era of Trump

Two JFK Facts commenters have recently criticized me personally, and I feel the need to respond. I know an editor should have a thick skin but a season of succesful conspiracy theorizing has opened up the real possibility that U.S. nuclear codes will soon be delivered into the hands of a racist buffoon. I’m feeling a little touchy.

So let me dispatch with these theories and theorists.

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Early raves for Natalie Portman’s  ‘Jackie’

This prestige-level drama seems primed to secure Natalie Portman an Oscar nomination with her in literally every scene of the film as Jackie Kennedy, putting a human face on this larger-than-life person

Source:  Movie News |

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Dealey Plaza eyewitness: Mary Moorman

Mary Moorman Breaks Her Silence – Interview from BAAM Videos on Vimeo.

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JFK Facts podcast: More about how to think (and not think) about the JFK story

Jefferson Morley and Alan Dale continue their discussion about the challenge of acquiring reliable methods by which reason and objectivity may prevail over alleged facts and confirmation bias.

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Retired CIA analyst: release all JFK files in 2017

Earlier this year I spoke about the JFK story with retired CIA analyst  Brian Latell on WIOD radio in MIami. Latell had  a clear message for his former employer: release all the JFK files without redactions.

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CIA report sheds new light on Angleteon’s role in Watergate

James Angleton

James Angleton, chief of the CIA’s Counterintelligence Staff.

Legendary CIA counterspy James Angleton was interviewed by federal investigators in 1973 about a reported meeting with Watergate burglar Howard Hunt, according to a declassified CIA history made public this week.

Angleton responded by dissembling about his relationship with Hunt and threatening legal action against the source of the story.

The report, first obtained by Judicial Watch, sheds new light on the agency’s role in the burglary that brought down President Richard Nixon in 1974 and changed the course of American politics.

James Jesus Angleton, chief of the agency’s Counterintelligence Staff, reached the peak of his powers during the Nixon’s presidency. But his backstage role in the Watergate affair has gone largely unnoticed.

Fox News correspondent James Rosen delivered the goods: Read more

Exclusive: JFK investigator on how CIA stonewalled Congress

Dan Hardway

Dan Hardway

In a new sworn declaration filed in federal court, former JFK investigator Dan Hardway tells the story of how the CIA stonewalled him and other investigators for the House Select Committee of Assassinations in 1978.

Hardway’s first-person story is the most vivid and powerful account of how the CIA obstructed Congress’s attempt to investigate JFK’s assassination in 1978 since Gaeton Fonzi’s book, The Last Investigation. Hardway adds new detail to the story Fonzi told by detailing the obstructionist tactics of George Joannides that he personally experienced.

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JFK Facts podcast: How to think (and not think) about the JFK story

Jefferson Morley and Alan Dale discuss the unique challenge of sifting misinformation, disinformation, and government secrecy while trying to established a rational and factual foundation of thinking about the assassination of President Kennedy.

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Cuba’s JFK story: 638 ways to kill Fidel Castro

What does the Cuban government say about the assassination of President Kennedy, allegedly by a supporter of President Fidel Castro?

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RIP: Muckracker Warren Hinckle dies at 77

“Warren was the godfather of California — and, you could say, national — progressive journalism,” said David Talbot, whose book, “Season of the Witch,” details the tumultuous history of San Francisco from the 1960s to the early ’80s. “As a newsman, he just loved the ’60s as a story, with all its weirdness, from the Black Panthers to hippies in the Haight to the Kennedy assassination. No publication caught it better than Ramparts — it led directly to publications like Rolling Stone, Mother Jones and Salon,” the Web magazine Talbot co-founded in 1995.

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