22 November 1963: How to think about the JFK story

One of the most incisive introductions to the complexity of the JFK assassination story comes not from America but Britain. See the Web site 22 November 1963 for a clear understanding of the worst U.S. intelligence failure between Pearl Harbor and September 11.  (H/T Jeremy)

CIA may still have photos of Oswald in Mexico City

One mystery of JFK assassination story is why accused assassin Lee Oswald was not photographed when he visited the Embassy of the Soviet Union in Mexico City two months before President Kennedy was killed in Dallas.

Mexico City mystery man

The CIA thought he was Lee H. Oswald.

The CIA had three photographic surveillance bases to take pictures of visitors to the Embassy. Oswald visited the Embassy at least twice in an unsuccessful effort to obtain a visa. But the CIA says no photograph of Oswald was taken.

The photo to the right, which CIA personnel in Mexico City mistakenly linked to Oswald, depicted a man who was never conclusively identified.

In 1978 investigators from the House Select Committee on Assassinations Read more

Dr. David Mantik explains a JFK autopsy mystery image

“Purpose—To solve the mystery of the 6.5 mm “metallic” object on President John F. Kennedy’s anterior-posterior (AP) skull X-ray. This image was not seen or reported during the official autopsy on November 22, 1963 [JFK Facts emphasis added], but first appeared in the historical record in 1968 with the release of the Clark Panel Report.”

Source: Open Journal Systems

Read more

JFK autopsy photo may have been faked, says Jim Marrs

JFK mystery image

The vertical arrow points to a bullet fragment not found in JFK’s autopsy

“According to investigative journalist Jim Marrs, a new study of JFK’s autopsy reveals falsification of X-ray evidence. Marrs, author of the best-selling book, “Crossfire,” claims that the famous bullet fragment depicted in the autopsy X-ray is an artifact superimposed on the X-ray after JFK’s autopsy.

Read more

Peter Dale Scott reconceives the JFK story

Peter Dale Scott Dallas '63

Peter Dale Scott’s conceptualization of the assassination of President Kennedy offers a bracing challenge to contemporary American historiography, political science, and national security studies.

“Since the aftermath of World War II, the deep state’s power has grown unchecked, and nowhere has it been more apparent than at sun-dappled Dealey Plaza on November 22, 1963,” the publishers of his new book write.

Certainly Kennedy’s violent death and the failure to hold senior CIA officials responsible for the intelligence failure it represented marked a decisive moment in the consolidation of secretive power centers in the American state.

Source: Dallas ’63: The First Deep State Revolt Against the White House (Forbidden Bookshelf) – Kindle edition by Peter Dale Scott.

‘Tiny details can be critical:’ Mark Lawson on William Manchester

Its 700 pages cover just five days, from preparations for the flight to Dallas to the burial of the 35th president. … [Manchester constructs an astonishing multi-viewpoint narrative in sections named after the Secret Service code-words in use on the days in question, including “Lancer” (the president) and “Castle” (the White House).

Source: A forensic study of JFK’s death debunked the conspiracies  | Mark Lawson | Comment is free | The Guardian

U.S.-Cuba diplomacy comes out of the shadows 

From William LeoGrand and Peter Kornbluh, the back story from Havana: U.S.-Cuba Diplomacy Comes Out of the Shadows | Foreign Policy.

What does this story have to do with JFK’s assassination? Read more

Robert Groden: his JFK life depicted in Dutch documentary

And here is the real fascination of this film. It’s just not that simple. It’s not as easy as dismissing Robert Groden as a nutcase. He’s weird. He’s way unusual. He’s obsessive as hell. But how do we know — Do we know? — that obsession is automatically or always wrong or destructive? What if he’s right?

From Dallas Observer: Dutch Documentary Portrays Dallas Conspiracy Guy  Read more

More about JFK Primary Sources

In response to yesterday’s post, a man named Will writes that he is the creator of JFK Primary Sources:
Read more

JFK is just one chapter in the History of the CIA

The JFK story is just one reason why you’ll want to take my online course, History of the CIA: 1947 to Today. Read more

Lisa Pease on James Angleton, counterintelligence chief

There’s no one more interesting and important in the JFK story–and indeed the history of the CIA–who is more important than the late James Angleton.

Read more

’11 seconds in Dallas’: The details of the theory

Max Holland comments on my post about Dale Myers and Todd Vaughan’s criticism of his 6th Floor Museum presentation on the gunfire in Dallas..

I wrote: Read more

Max Holland responds to Myers and Vaughan about Dealey Plaza

I asked Max Holland if he wanted to respond to the critique of his recent 6th Floor Museum presentation made by Dale K Myers and Todd W. Vaughan. Holland replied:

Read more

Face to face with the CIA: JFK investigators tell their story

“Initially, the CIA was cooperating — we had no reason to think that they weren’t… [It was] when we started pushing… on investigating the disinformation efforts after the assassination, and realizing that I could tie just about every single disinformation effort directly back to David Phillips, that George Joannides gets involved.”—Dan Hardway.

Read more

Phil Shenon’s cruel and shocking misinterpretation

Phil Shenon

Phil Shenon,

Phil Shenon and I agree on at least a few things. In any resolution of the mysteries surrounding the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Mexico City will undoubtedly be important. The investigation into what happened there in 1963 was, for some reason, seriously curtailed by the U.S. government. The government has, since then, fought tooth and nail to keep the full story about what happened there secret.

While I have never met Shenon, I have spoken with him several times by telephone. I first heard from him when he called me around 2011. He introduced himself as a reporter for Newsweek Magazine. He said he was working well in advance on an article for that magazine for the 50th anniversary of JFK’s murder. He wondered whether I would be willing to talk about the HSCA’s investigation in Mexico City. I agreed to speak with him. Read more