Category: Quotable

JFK on Secrecy

Responding to President Biden’s Oct. 22 letter on JFK files, Jerry sent this:

“The very word ‘secrecy’ is repugnant in a free and open society; and we are as a people inherently and historically opposed to secret societies, to secret oaths and to secret proceedings. We decided long ago that the dangers of excessive and u warranted concealment of pertinent facts far outweighed the dangers which are cited to justify it.” — President John F. Kennedy April 27, 1961.

Former chief JFK investigator on CIA obstruction

“I now no longer believe anything the Agency [CIA] told the committee any further than I can obtain substantial corroboration for it from outside the Agency for its veracity…. “

— G. Robert Blakey, former Chief Counsel to the House Select Committee on Assassinations, in an addendum to the web page for the Frontline episode “Who Was Lee Harvey Oswald?”.

RFK & Jackie: ‘He [Oswald] did not act alone’

“Perhaps there was only one assassin, but he did not act alone …. Dallas was the ideal location for such a crime.”

— William Walton, a friend of the Kennedys’, speaking on behalf of Robert and Jacqueline Kennedy. Walton delivered his message in Moscow to Georgi Bolshakov, who had been a backchannel to the Soviet leadership and was asked to repeat it to Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev. This incident occurred a week after the assassination.

RFK: CIA director said two people involved in JFK shooting

“I asked him [RFK], perhaps tactlessly, about Oswald. He said that there could be no serious doubt that he was guilty, but there was still argument whether he did it by himself or as part of a larger plot, whether organized by Castro or by gangsters. He said that the FBI thought he had done it by himself, but that McCone thought there were two people involved in the shooting.”

— Arthur Schlesinger writing about a conversation with Robert Kennedy on Dec. 5, 1963, quoted in Schlesinger’s Journals: 1952-2000, p. 214.

‘Together they will observe the law of silence’

Talbot has an eye for quotes, and one memorable one is derived from the memoirs of French President Charles de Gaulle’s information minister, Alain Peyrefitte. Talbot quotes at some length from the words de Gaulle spoke upon his return from the Kennedy funeral. After talking insightfully about the assassination – de Gaulle was a recent target himself – the French president observed the possibility of great upheaval in America, but concluded that it would all be swept under the rug: “But you’ll see. All of them together will observe the law of silence … They don’t want to know. They don’t want to find out. They won’t allow themselves to find out.”

Source: Mary Ferrell Foundation on  The Devil’s Chessboard

 JFK on John McCone

President Kennedy was aware of McCone’s less than enthusiastic embrace of his administration. As reported by Talbot in The Devil’s Chessboard, “In March, the president’s secret White House recording system picked up a heated conversation between the Kennedy brothers about their increasingly disloyal CIA director. McCone, Bobby informed his brother, was going around Washington feeding anti-Kennedy information to the press. ‘He’s a real bastard, that John McCone,’ responded JFK. ‘Well, he was useful at a time,’ observed Bobby. ‘Yeah,’ replied the president ruefully, ‘but, boy, it’s really evaporated.’”[iv]

Source: Read — 2017 JFK

Will Jeb Bush follow his father on JFK secrecy?

Jeb Bush
Jeb Bush ‘s JFK moment

One question facing Republican presidential candidate Jeb BUsh  is whether he would, as president, allow U.S. government agencies to continue to withhold 3,600 JFK assassination records from public view after their scheduled release in October 2017.

One reader thinks President Jeb Bush would decide in favor of JFK secrecy. He calls attention to what Jeb’s father said on the issue, particularly George H.W. Bush’s signing statement attached to the 1992 JFK Assassination Records Act.

The first President Bush stated: …

Fidel Castro on JFK’s assassination

“First of all, nobody ever goes that way for a visa. Second, it costs money to go that distance. He (Oswald) stormed into the embassy, demanded the visa, and when it was refused to him, headed out saying ‘I’m going to kill Kennedy for this.’…..What is your government doing to catch the other assassins? It took about three people.”

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