Tag Archive for George Joannides

Top 5 JFK files that the CIA is still hiding

The government’s release of long-secret JFK assassination records is generating headlines and hype worldwide. But the truth is the majority of the JFK files that were supposed to be released last month remain secret—and may forever if the CIA has its way. Read more

Bowing to public opinion, the CIA releases more JFK files

Good news: The CIA has released another batch of JFK assassination-related records, according to the New York Times.

In the face of criticism from a federal judge and the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, the CIA has released 676 new documents related to the murder of President Kennedy in Dallas, Texas, in November 1963.

As always, I’m looking for any files on my top 5 JFK suspects: James Angleton, Bill Harvey, David Phillips, Ann Goodpasture, and George Joannides.  And anything on CIA operations in Mexico City and New Orleans.

If you find something interesting, drop me a line.

Source: Secret C.I.A. Documents May Shed New Light on J.F.K. Killing – The New York Times

What Trump and the CIA are still concealing: The George Joannides files

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What we know about the coming JFK records release

Secret JFK document #3: the DRE/AMSPELL file

DREAmong the 1,100 secret CIA documents related to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy is an 86 page file of the anti-Castro group, Directorio Revolucionario Estudantil (DRE)

The group, commonly known as the Cuban Student Directorate, had a curious double role in the JFK assassination story–a role that the CIA chose to conceal from both the Warren Commission in 1964 and the House Selection Committee on Assassinations (HSCA) in the late 1970s.

The deception was not minor: CIA-funded DRE was the first organization to call public attention to accused assassin Lee Oswald–before JFK was killed.

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Attention CIA: the whole world expects full JFK disclosure

Time Magazine Year Ahead Thanks to the Internet, the media is finally paying attention.

Three days ago, it was Macleans, the Canadian newsweekly, which ran an article about the impending release of thousands of secret JFK records in October 2016. Today it is Time magazine, which reports

The tortured path that began with a left turn onto Dealey Plaza on Nov. 22, 1963, will find its unlikely end point this October in College Park, Md. At a National Archives annex, the last remaining documents related to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy are being processed, scanned and readied for release.

In 2015, it was Politico which explained “Why the last of the JFK files could embarrass CIA.” In 2013 it was Associated Press that reported, “5 decades later, me JFK probe files still sealed.”

The story is out there. It is undisputed. And it has nothing to do with the stupid JFK conspiracy theories peddled by hucksters like Alex Jones.

Thanks to the Mary Ferrell Foundation and WhoWhatWhy, anybody who wants to know can see a listing of all the JFK records that are supposed to be released on or before October 26, 2017. Read more

On the 53rd anniversary, full JFK disclosure is coming

As we have learned, huge news stories can grow, mature and break right under  the noses of uncomprehending mainstream news reporters. So it is with the JFK story.

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Who was George Joannides?

Joannides was a CIA propaganda specialist who came out of retirement to prevent the House Select Committee on Assassinations discovering links between the CIA and the anti-Castro Cubans whom Lee Oswald had met in New Orleans.

Source: George Joannides and the JFK Assassination

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Oswald in New Orleans: Was he a psycho or the target of CIA psychological warfare?

Oswald in New Orleans

Lee Oswald in New Orleans, August 16, 1963

Fifty three years ago today, Lee Oswald, a self-taught leftist, a former Marine Corps radio operator, and a fluent speaker of Russian, handed out pamphlets for the pro-Castro Fair Play for Cuba Committee in New Orleans. Read more

Why I’m taking JFK to the Supreme Court

According to an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court filed this week in Washington, the language of the Freedom of Information Act is clear:

The court may assess against the United States reasonable attorney’s fees and other litigation costs reasonably incurred in any case under this section in which the complainant has substantially prevailed.

The Obama Justice Department doesn’t want to admit it but, in Morley v. CIA, yours truly substantially prevailed. Will the Supreme Court be interested?

It’s a long shot, but I try to think like Steph Curry; sometimes a long shot is worth taking.

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Present at the cover-up: how a CIA man stonewalled Congress


In this video for Black Ops Radio, Dan Hardway, a former investigator for the House Select Committee, talks about the HSCA’s investigation in 1978 and how the CIA obstructed it.

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Phil Shenon’s cruel and shocking misinterpretation

Phil Shenon

Phil Shenon,

Phil Shenon and I agree on at least a few things. In any resolution of the mysteries surrounding the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Mexico City will undoubtedly be important. The investigation into what happened there in 1963 was, for some reason, seriously curtailed by the U.S. government. The government has, since then, fought tooth and nail to keep the full story about what happened there secret.

While I have never met Shenon, I have spoken with him several times by telephone. I first heard from him when he called me around 2011. He introduced himself as a reporter for Newsweek Magazine. He said he was working well in advance on an article for that magazine for the 50th anniversary of JFK’s murder. He wondered whether I would be willing to talk about the HSCA’s investigation in Mexico City. I agreed to speak with him. Read more

Former chief JFK investigator on CIA obstruction

“I now no longer believe anything the Agency [CIA] told the committee any further than I can obtain substantial corroboration for it from outside the Agency for its veracity…. “

— G. Robert Blakey, former Chief Counsel to the House Select Committee on Assassinations, in an addendum to the web page for the Frontline episode “Who Was Lee Harvey Oswald?”.

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7 JFK files the CIA still keeps secret

It is not a theory that the CIA is still keeping secrets about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963. It is a documented fact.

Here is what is known about seven key JFK files — containing more than 3,000 pages of material — that the CIA is still keeping out of public view until October 2017.

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Morley v. CIA: highlights from the decision

Highlights from the opinion of Judge Stephen Williams concerning the FOIA lawsuit for JFK assassination, Morley v. CIA. 

The decision was affirmed by Judges Douglas Ginsburg and Sri Srinvasan.

I’m the plaintiff and I have added my comments:

The Court:

Morley contends that some of the documents turned over—a couple of travel records and a photograph and citation relating to a career medal once received by Joannides—shed some light on President Kennedy’s assassination, but the value of these documents is at best unclear.

Morley:  If the CIA wants to clear up the story of George Joannides’ secret operations in 1963, it is free to do so at any time. I hope they will do so before October 25, 2017 when the JFK Records Act mandates the release of the agency’s still-secret JFK assassination-related records.

The Court:

Morley’s request had potential public value. He has proffered—and the CIA has not disputed—that Joannides served as the CIA case officer for a Cuban group, the DRE, with whose officers Oswald was in contact prior to the assassination.

Morley: No one is much surprised that the CIA sees no “public benefit” in talking publicly about certain covert operations in late 1963. That’s politically understandable in Langley. It is not legally acceptable in the context of JFK, says the court.

Where that subject is the Kennedy assassinationan event with few rivals in national trauma and in the array of passionately held conflicting explanationsshowing potential public value is relatively easy.

Morley: This is not a controversial proposition. Full JFK disclosure has public value. The CIA disagrees but the law and Judge Williams and common sense say otherwise.