JFK Facts Podcast: Gaeton Fonzi

Our 9th program featuring analysis and discussion of topics relevant to the study of President Kennedy’s assassination. This week we focus upon investigative journalist, Gaeton Fonzi, his essential book, The Last Investigation, his legacy and the publication of his 1996 article on General Fabian Escalante:

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2 comments

  1. MDG says:

    It took a lot of courage for G Fonzi to spell out the truth in great detail in The Last Investigation.

    “Bob Blakey and the members of the Assassinations Committee must have known that the Committee’s investigation of the CIA was a charade, mostly a superficial wallowing about in files that only went so far and so deep. ………………That admission reflects the Committee’s unwillingness to confront a powerful government apparatus and its unwillingness to demand the truth from it— a truth the Committee had the right, by law, and the obligation to know. In avoiding that confrontation, the Congressmen failed in their Constitutional role. The Committee was simply afraid. Such a confrontation would be too large, too elemental, too risky to all the institutions of government that form the power structure of the Washington establishment. And much too politically risky. So in the end, the House Select Committee on Assassinations, like the Warren Commission before it, produced a report that looked comprehensive and complete, but which failed the American people”.
    Fonzi, Gaeton. The Last Investigation, p. 404-405, Kindle Edition.

  2. Marie Fonzi says:

    Blakey dropped the ball once again by failing to send Al Gonzalez, Gaeton’s partner in the Miami investigation, to question Castro. Al was furious at the oversight since he had established a positive relationship with Castro when he served as his New York police bodyguard on his visit to New York

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