Review

Angleton: The role of a ‘master bureaucratic operator’ in the JFK story

I think this might be the most cogent radio interview I did about THE GHOST.

(Just because I was on Lew Rockwell’s show doesn’t mean I agree with this politics.)

The Watergate burglar and a CIA operation to deflect Cuba’s allegations about JFK’s assassination

Dirty TricksIn his new book, Dirty Tricks: Nixon, Watergate and the CIA, Shane O’Sullivan lays bare a scandalously under-covered story: the role of CIA personnel in the Watergate scandal and its aftermath.

In an excerpt for the Washington Post, O’Sullivan tells an intriguing tale about Watergate burglar Rolando Martinez, the CIA operative who was pardoned by President Reagan in 1984. Antonio Veciana, the CIA operative who says he saw Lee Harvey Oswald with David Phillips two months before JFK was killed, has an interesting role in the story.

O’Sullivan’s story doesn’t directly bear on the JFK story but it does show that Veciana was a trusted agency operative through the 1970s.

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Order the paperback edition of THE GHOST now

From the new paperback edition of THE GHOST:

“Historians and journalists usually describe COINTELPRO as an FBI program, which is not quite the case. It was created by Hoover but functioned as a joint FBI-CIA venture, with a bureaucratic division of labor. Hoover took the lead in targeting dissident Americans inside the United States; Angleton took the lead outside the United States. In the case of the Fair Play for Cuba Committee and its most famous member Lee Harvey Oswald, the FBI and the CIA would work together.
Angleton used the HUNTER program to feed the COINTELPRO beast.”

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Bobby Kennedy for President, according to Netflix

With its jazz-infused score by Paul Brill and silhouetted profiles of its detail-obsessed subject deep in thought, Dawn Porter’s engrossing four-part documentary depicts Kennedy as a blend of morally upright pop-culture icon and rich kid turned calculating political machine. “He’s two people … he’s a cop at heart,” says JFK, describing the fair-minded, uber-competitive runt of the litter who once worked for the communist-hating Joseph McCarthy but was also the brains behind his brother’s election to the Sen

Source: What’s on TV on demand | Culture | The Sunday Times

Connecting the dots in the Met Breuer’s show about conspiracy theories

 

Oswald/Ruby

Wayne Gonzales’ two oversized neon paintings of JFK’s accused assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, and his own killer, Jack Ruby, open the exhibition. (Hyperallergic) 

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Lou Berney on ‘November Road’

Growing up in Oklahoma City, Dallas was so close and every summer we would go down there. My parents were fascinated by the Kennedy assassination, so my dad would always drive us through Dealey Plaza and I remember at a very, very young age looking up at the window in the sixth floor of the School Book Depository Building.

Source: San Diego Union

Anticipation is high for Lou Berney’s novel ‘November Road’ 

November RoadI mentioned Lou Berney’s JFK novel November Road the other day, not knowing that this is a Big Book, at least in the publishing world.

It tells of an Oklahoma woman on the run from her husband, an underling to New Orleans-based mobster Carlos Marcello, who is trying to make himself vanish in the wake of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination. They’re both heading West, and encounter each other in Las Vegas, where JFK was known to spend some free time.

Source: Anticipation is high for Lou Berney’s novel ‘November Road’ – The Washington Post

Angleton today: Smoke, mirrors, and mass surveillance

James Angleton

James Angleton

In the current issue of the New York Review of Books Max Hastings, conservative British journalist and pundit, contextualizes James Angleton in the history of U.S. intelligence. Hastings writes:

“The Ghost, Jefferson Morley’s shrewd account of Angleton’s career as Langley’s counterintelligence chief from 1954 to 1975, shows the harm that can be done by an energetic spook who is permitted grossly excessive latitude. The Ghost focuses on two manifestations of this.

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The perils of the court historian in the JFK era

Do we need more historians in senior government positions? Arthur Schlesinger provides an interesting test case.

Source: The Perils of the Court Historian–War on the Rocks

Pentagon history documents hostility to JFK in 1963

Michael Swanson, an investment adviser turned JFK researcher, called my attention to “Council of War,” a fascinating official history of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, which documents the Pentagon’s resistance to, and resentment of, President Kennedy’s foreign policy, especially on Cuba and Vietnam.

Published by the JCS, the study presents an unvarnished view of an unprecedented mistrust between White House and Pentagon in the year before Kennedy was violently removed from power.

“Read this book and you are reading a real history of the American empire and defense establishment written for future leaders of the Pentagon and armed forces,” writes Swanson, who plans to publish his own study of the Cold War from 1945-1963 in the fall.

Some highlights from “Council of War:”

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‘Creating Chaos’: covert political warfare from Truman to Putin

I’m looking forward to reading Larry Hancock’s new book, Creating Chaos, because he’s a scholar, not (thank god) a conspiracy theorist. And Hancock’s historical perspective clarifies the roots of a new 21st century reality: the rise of hybrid warfare, as waged by intelligence agencies, regardless of ideology

Creating Chaos explores that dark side of statecraft, the covert use of political warfare in international relations – from its early practices during the Great Game between the British and Russian empires, through the Cold War era of ideological confrontation and forward into the hybrid political warfare of the 21st Century

Source: New Book! Creating Chaos/Covert Political Warfare from Truman to Putin 

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Irish Examiner on The Ghost 

In The Ghost, Jefferson Morley, an experienced Washington Post journalist, writes fluently and engagingly about the elusive spymaster James Angleton.

Source: The Ghost by Jefferson Morley – corkucopia

Oswald appeared to be ‘guided by others’

In his response to Thomas Powers review of THE GHOST, Bill Kelly makes a point that Powers is loathe to admit. People who observed Oswald after his defection to the Soviet Union suspected that he had ties to be intelligence world.

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Spy vs. Spy: Soviet defector Yuri Nosenko confronted CIA accuser James Angleton

A new JFK assassination tape found among the new JFK files in the the National Archives yields the previously unknown coda of one of the most famous espionage controversies of the 20th century. Read more

The untold story of James Angleton

James Angleton testifies

James Angleton, spymaster

A reader asks about my  biography of James Angleton:

Q. “Is the first “true” biography (and I’m not doubting you) but is that because of the new information you’ve found or is it that you’re giving a more exhaustive rundown of his entire life which the other biographies lacked?”

A: “Both.”

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