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national security Archives > JFK Facts

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Oliver Stone on Trump and JFK

Oliver Stone on the still-secret JFK files that are supposed to be released in October 2021:

Stone believes that no US president since Kennedy died has been “able to go up against this militarised sector of our economy”. Even Trump “backed down at the last second” and declined to release all the relevant documents relating to the assassination. “He announced, ‘I’m going to free it up, blah blah blah, big talk, and then a few hours before, he caved to CIA National Security again.”

Stone is absolutely correct on this point. Read here.

Source: Oliver Stone interview: ‘There’s still a presence out there reminding people not to speak about JFK’s killing’ | The Independent

I’ll be in federal court on March 19 talking about key missing JFK files

Barrett Prettyman Courthouse
Where federal judges will hear oral arguments about CIA JFK files.

On Monday morning March 19  my attorneys Jim Lesar and Dan Alcorn and I will appear at the Barrett Prettyman federal courthouse in Washington for oral arguments in my long-running lawsuit, Morley v. CIA.

The issue before the three-judge panel: has there been a “public benefit” from the lawsuit’s disclosure of long-secret documents about deceased CIA officer George Joannides? …

The National Security State & JFK: a Future of Freedom Foundation conference

I’ll be speaking at this event in June with an all-star team of JFK authors, historians, and national security experts. If you’re interested in the so-called “Deep State” and its relevance today, you won’t want to miss this conference.

The Future of Freedom Foundation is pleased to announce one of the most fascinating, important, and relevant conferences in our 27-year history. Entitled “The National Security State and JFK,” the conference will be held on Saturday, June 3, 2017, at the Dulles Airport Marriott in Northern Virginia. Admission price: $99.

Source: The National Security State & JFK – The Future of Freedom Foundation

Oliver Stone says ex-government agent told him ‘JFK assassination was an inside job’

Oliver Stone/Kevin Costner
Oliver Stone, right, with Kevin Costner on the set of ‘JFK”

Stone, 69, said his doubts about ‘Ron’ were dispelled. As a former marine in Vietnam, the film-maker was convinced by the ‘military jargon’ and intricate details within an account that he describes as ‘plausible’ and ‘very authentic’.

Source: Ex-government agent claimed ‘JFK assassination was an inside job’ | Daily Mail Online

Unlike “JFK,”  the movie,” this allegation seems uncorroborated. “Military jargon” and “authentic” details do not constitute corroboration.

JFK on a military coup: ‘It could happen in this country’

“It’s possible. It could happen in this country, but the conditions would have to be just right. If, for example, the country had a young President, and he had a Bay of Pigs, there would be a certain uneasiness. Maybe the military would do a little criticizing behind his back, but this would be written off as the usual military dissatisfaction with civilian control.”

JFK went on:

JFK: hawk or a dove?

“Those who make peaceful revolution impossible make violent revolution inevitable:”

In this well-edited YouTube piece, Eytmon reminds us that President Kennedy was a “dove,” a leader more inclined to restrain U.S. military power than to unleash it. While JFK was often aggressive in rhetoric, he also emphasized peace was “necessary and rational.” It was his experience as a Navy lieutenant in World War II who repeatedly faced death in battle that made the cause of peace personally urgent to him. It also distinguished him from the hawks of his day

Beyond Snowden: putting democracy into national security

“In the aftermath of Edward Snowden’s disclosures, public debate largely focused on balancing personal privacy and national security interests as they relate to governmental collection of communications data.  While this approach is fruitful, it consumes so much attention that it inadvertently overshadows a fundamental question: who authorized the government’s wide-reaching national security policies and who oversees and reviews their implementation?”

Bringing democracy to national security policy | TheHill.

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