Tag: assassination

On JFK’s 99th birthday

is today. The 35th President of the United States was born on May 29, 1917.

“John Kennedy was urbane, objective, analytical, controlled, contained,

masterful, a man of perspective,” –Arthur Schlesinger.

HIs violent death was a terrible loss for the country. Yet the CIA still hasn’t released all of its JFK assassination files. Next month, I will publish a short ebook that exposes this sorry state of affairs and explains what can be done about it in 2017.

 

JFK: the complex reality

Indeed, the complex reality of how a president of the United States came to be gunned down on a sunny day, and no one lost his liberty — or his job — continues to live and grow in popular memory.

Crumbling consensus: Warren Commission staffer recants, says there was a JFK conspiracy

It has never been any secret that many serious people at the top of the U.S. government did not believe that President Kennedy was killed by a proverbial “lone nut.” But the elites of Washington have always preferred to ignore such suspicions.

Until today, when former New York Times reporter Phil Shenon reports in Politico magazine on the conspiratorial suspicions of one David Slawson, a retired law professor who investigated JFK’s assassination for the Warren Commission and now admits he got it wrong.

Slawson’s views are not unprecedented in elite power circles of Washington. Far from it.

Did the CIA seek to hypnotize an assassin to kill Fidel Castro?

James Angleton
James Angleton, counterintelligence chief

c

Yes. It was James Angleton’s idea.

In May 1963, deputy director Richard Helms asked Angleton, the legendary chief of the agency’s Counterintelligence Staff,  to assess the problem of Cuba for the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Angleton wrote a 16-page working paper, “Cuban Control and Action Capabilities” that was so sensitive it would remain classified for the next 35 years.

Angleton’s conclusions were stark. Castro’s minions were marching into Latin America aided and abetted by their masters in Moscow, he said.

Howard Willens weighs in on RFK’s suspicions of conspiracy

Howard Willens, former Warren Commission staffer, has responded to Philip Shenon’s article in Politico about Attorney General Robert Kennedy being a “conspiracy theorist” and my post, “Why RFK refused to swear there was no conspiracy.”

In a new post at HowardWillens.com, Willens says the dispute should be broken down into three questions:

H.R. Haldeman: “We would be in a position to get all the facts “

“An investigation of the Kennedy assassination was a project I suggested when I first entered the White House [in 1969]. I had always been intrigued with the conflicting theories of the assassination. Now I felt we would be in a position to get all the facts. But Nixon turned me down.”

– H.R Haldeman, chief of staff to President Richard Nixon, from his book, The Ends of Power (p. 39).

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