Tag Archive for national security

Angleton and the Deep State: a conversation

I recently spoke with David Murrell of the Washingtonian magazine about THE GHOST and the relevance of the James Angleton story today. He also asked about JFK and I replied like this:

Read more

The National Security State & JFK: a Future of Freedom Foundation conference

I’ll be speaking at this event in June with an all-star team of JFK authors, historians, and national security experts. If you’re interested in the so-called “Deep State” and its relevance today, you won’t want to miss this conference.

The Future of Freedom Foundation is pleased to announce one of the most fascinating, important, and relevant conferences in our 27-year history. Entitled “The National Security State and JFK,” the conference will be held on Saturday, June 3, 2017, at the Dulles Airport Marriott in Northern Virginia. Admission price: $99.

Source: The National Security State & JFK – The Future of Freedom Foundation

Oliver Stone says ex-government agent told him ‘JFK assassination was an inside job’

Oliver Stone/Kevin Costner

Oliver Stone, right, with Kevin Costner on the set of ‘JFK”

Stone, 69, said his doubts about ‘Ron’ were dispelled. As a former marine in Vietnam, the film-maker was convinced by the ‘military jargon’ and intricate details within an account that he describes as ‘plausible’ and ‘very authentic’.

Source: Ex-government agent claimed ‘JFK assassination was an inside job’ | Daily Mail Online

Unlike “JFK,”  the movie,” this allegation seems uncorroborated. “Military jargon” and “authentic” details do not constitute corroboration.

Read more

Why James Angleton is still a national security issue

My story in The Intercept: “How the CIA Writes History.”

Two JFK books on Amazon best-seller list

Two JFK books published by The Future of Freedom Foundation are doing well on Amazon, indicative of the persistent demand for a credible explanation of the Dallas tragedy. Read more

JFK on a military coup: ‘It could happen in this country’

“It’s possible. It could happen in this country, but the conditions would have to be just right. If, for example, the country had a young President, and he had a Bay of Pigs, there would be a certain uneasiness. Maybe the military would do a little criticizing behind his back, but this would be written off as the usual military dissatisfaction with civilian control.”

JFK went on:

Read more

The Ellsberg challenge: ‘dismantling the national-security state’

Jacob’s responds to Dan Ellsberg’s JFK challenge: what do you want to happen when people come to an understanding of the causes of Kennedy’s death?

Read more

JFK: hawk or a dove?

“Those who make peaceful revolution impossible make violent revolution inevitable:”

In this well-edited YouTube piece, Eytmon reminds us that President Kennedy was a “dove,” a leader more inclined to restrain U.S. military power than to unleash it. While JFK was often aggressive in rhetoric, he also emphasized peace was “necessary and rational.” It was his experience as a Navy lieutenant in World War II who repeatedly faced death in battle that made the cause of peace personally urgent to him. It also distinguished him from the hawks of his day

Read more

Who was George Joannides and why is his story important?

Joannides, now deceased, was an undercover CIA officer, whose actions provides strong evidence that certain Agency personnel manipulated Lee Harvey Oswald for propaganda purposes before and after President Kennedy was shot dead in Dallas on November 22, 1963.

Read more

Beyond Snowden: putting democracy into national security

“In the aftermath of Edward Snowden’s disclosures, public debate largely focused on balancing personal privacy and national security interests as they relate to governmental collection of communications data.  While this approach is fruitful, it consumes so much attention that it inadvertently overshadows a fundamental question: who authorized the government’s wide-reaching national security policies and who oversees and reviews their implementation?”

Bringing democracy to national security policy | TheHill.

Alan Dale talks to Peter Dale Scott

Peter Dale Scott

Peter Dale Scott

Alan Dale, moderator of JFK Essentials forum, had been conducting  conversations with JFK authors, including me. But the one I’m most interested in hearing is Dale’s interview of Professor Peter Dale Scott, the author of “Deep Politics and the Death of JFK,” among many other books.

I don’t always agree with Scott — his ideas about the Sept. 11 attacks strike me as more imaginative than credible — but he is a formidable intellect whose provocative writings and deep research on JFK and the national security state are have taught me a lot.

Listen to Dale’s interview with Scott.

.

Was Oswald a CIA operative or not?

As Jacob Hornberger notes in his blog for  The Future of Freedom Foundation, this very basic question about the assassination of President Kennedy cannot be answered in 2013 — thanks to the Agency’s obfuscations, based on far-fetched claims of “national security.”

Read more

JFK’s cousin talks on the 50th anniversary

Kerry McCarthy, the daughter of President Kennedy’s sister, spoke at the JFK Lancer conference in November 2013, and I was lucky enough to be there.

(Skip ahead to Deb Conway’s introduction, which begins at 2:00)

JFK Lancer is a business founded on these premises:

Read more

In ‘State Secret’ Simpich solves an Oswald mystery

I’ve been remiss in keeping up with posts on the serialization of Bill Simpich’s remarkable book “State Secret,” now available for free at the Mary Ferrell Foundation website.

“State Secret” tells the story of Lee Harvey Oswald in Mexico City in October 1963 in unprecedented detail and clarity. I told this story, as it was seen through the eyes of station chief Win Scott, in my book, “Our Man in Mexico.” But I can see now that  my account, while not wrong, is simplistic. Using documents declassified after I wrote my book, Simpich shows there was rather more going on than I knew.

Read more

Friend your friendly NSA

The Obama administration isn’t asking you to “friend” the Facebook page of the National Security Agency. They don’t offer that option for some reason. We, the customers of NSA, as it were, are not happy about this. We would like the option to “friend” NSA.

Fortunately, you can still “Like” NSA and so you should now. This is the way to express your fealty to Big Brother, just like they did in George Orwell’s “1984.” Honor NSA for capturing your metadata and putting it to good use in programming a drone to wipe out a wedding party on the other side of the planet. It wasn’t your wedding, so don’t worry about it. Just be a pal to the surveillance state.Do the right thing. “Like” NSA.