Dealey Plaza closed for JFK miniseries

Dealey Plaza in downtown Dallas will be closed this week for the filming of a miniseries about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy

When I was in Dallas on the 50th anniversary of JFK’s assassination I watched a contracted work crew scraping off the painted white X marking the exactly spot on Elm Street where President Kennedy shot down. Out out damned spot, cried Lady Macbeth as did the Dallas city fathers. The stain must be excised.

The white X has returned to Dealey Plaza and so has mythmaker Stephen King, according to KDFW.  The inventive and prolific novelist is staging his time travel JFK yarn, November 22, 1963 on the scene of the crime,

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The latest legal brief in Morley v. CIA

Joannides medal

Retired CIA officer George Joannides (left) received the Career Intelligence Medal in 1981, two years after misleading House investigators about what he knew about Lee Oswald. (Photo credit: CIA)

Here’s the latest legal brief that I have filed in my Freedom of Information Act lawsuit seeking long secret CIA records relevant to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

The brief, written by my attorney Jim Lesar, challenges the CIA’s contention that the disclosures forced by Morley v. CIA have no “public benefit.” Understandably worried about the agency’s credibility on the JFK story, the CIA’s lawyers are essentially arguing that the lawsuit is frivolous.

The CIA’s problem is that more than 30 news organizations worldwide disagree. New sites ranging  from New York Times to the Dallas Morning News to the Huffington Post to the UK’s Daily Mail covered the lawsuit and the resulting disclosures.

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From JFK hater to admirer: the Antonio Veciana story

“Like many of my exile contemporaries, at the time, in the early 1960’s, I believed John F. Kennedy was a traitor to the Cuban exiles and to this country. Yet, over time, I came to recognize that President Kennedy was not a traitor, but someone who acted in the interests always of the United States of America.”

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About those Kennedy Kards

The now poignant Kennedy Kards deck was published in early 1963 when the public infatuation with JFK had been revitalized by his statesmanship in the Cuban missile crisis of October 1962.

JFK was the Jack of Hearts, First Lady Jackie the Queen of Hearts, and Bobby Kennedy, the King of Diamonds.

“Long live the King, Queen and Jack,” proclaimed an informational card that came with the deck.

Within the year, the Jack of Clubs, Vice President Lyndon Johnson, would be president. Read more

How Dallas led to Beatlemania 

Source: Krerowicz will discuss how the assassination of Kennedy helped Beatlemania flourish.

Who did Jackie Kennedy think killed her husband?

Jackie Kennedy’s private thoughts about Dallas

A few things are known for sure. First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, 34 years old and dressed in a U.S.-made knock off of a pink Chanel suit, was looking at her husband’s face with concern from inches away when a bullet shattered his head.

After that horrible moment, Jackie had to pull herself together, give Jack the funeral he deserved. She assumed that her husband’s enemies had killed him. A week after the assassination, she and her brother-in-law Robert Kennedy confided in a friend, William Walton. They said they believed Dallas was the work of a high-level domestic plot, meaning JFK’s enemies on the political right.

But mostly Jackie didn’t want to think about who killed Jack. She was close to insane with grief, clutching to her brother-in-law who was devastated as well. She was often suicidal. And so Jackie fades from the crime story. The men who dominate the discussions of JFK conspiracy theories are often united in ignoring the views of the woman closest to the crime.

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French leader Charles de Gaulle thought he was targeted by the CIA in 1961

From David Talbot, author of the forthcoming non-fiction thriller “The Devil’s Chessboard.”

“In April 1961, as President Kennedy wrestled with the CIA disaster at the Bay of Pigs in Cuba, another CIA-related crisis gripped JFK’s young presidency. President Charles de Gaulle of France was threatened with a military coup by rebellious French officers based in Algeria, who were enraged by de Gaulle’s decision to settle that bloody colonial war. As rebellious tank units and paratroopers prepared to descend on Paris to overthrow French democracy, de Gaulle took to the TV airwaves,

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Watch the trailer for JFK documentary, ‘Killing Oswald’

The film is called Killing Oswald. I haven’t seen it but Mark Groubert has and here is what he said in his review for Crooks and Liars: Read more

JFK at the movies: ”Umbrella Man,’ a story of obsession

In “The Umbrella Man,” a film co-written by Rome (NY) natives Michael and Joe Grasso, Peter Brennan spirals into grief after the death of his young son while clinging to the conspiracy theories surrounding the mystery of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination.

Source: Local ties reign in ‘Umbrella Man,’ showing to be held at MWPAI – News – Uticaod – Utica, NY

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The Garrison Group: What one top CIA official said about Clay Shaw

Wistar Janney, CIA officer

Wistar Janney, CIA officer who monitored Jim Garrison

In response to a JFK Facts post on the CIA’s still-secret file on New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison, author Peter Janney  sent the following comment about the CIA’s secret monitoring of Garrison’s JFK investigation.

The fact that counterintelligence chief Jim Angleton oversaw this effort is very telling. Angleton’ job was to prevent penetration of the agency  by a foreign powers. Yet his Garrison Group showed no interest in whether Garrison was cooperating with or advancing the agenda of another intelligence service. So why did Angleton care? To me the most plausible explanation is that Angleton feared Garrison might uncovered evidence of a counterintelligence operation in New Orleans or Angleton’s pre-assassination interest in Oswald. Or both.

To the story Janney, the son of a CIA officer, adds an important detail that I had forgotten.

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22 November 1963: How to think about the JFK story

One of the most incisive introductions to the complexity of the JFK assassination story comes not from America but Britain. See the Web site 22 November 1963 for a clear understanding of the worst U.S. intelligence failure between Pearl Harbor and September 11.  (H/T Jeremy)

Fidel Castro: ‘Concerning the Facts and Consequences of the Tragic Death of President John F. Kennedy’

What Cuban leader Fidel Castro said  on November 23, 1963 about JFK’s assassination: Read more

‘Assassination Theater’ and the risk of rabbit holes

Assassination Theater

“The labyrinth of circumstances and people who could have been involved”

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Project ARTICHOKE: how the CIA tried to hypnotize an unwitting assassin

A revealing document from UNREDACTED, the blog of the nonprofit National Security Archive illuminates how CIA officers pondered carrying out political assassinations. Read more

Allen Dulles plays ‘The Devil’s Chessboard’ in David Talbot’s new book

“Former Salon founding editor-in-chief Talbot shares his extensive knowledge and intense investigations of American politics with a frightening biography of power, manipulation, and outright treason.”

From a starred notice in Kirkus Review.

This excellent book, which I am now reading, takes a harder look at the American establishment in the postwar era, linking the rise of Allen Dulles and the CIA to the national security state we now have, and places the assassination of President Kennedy in a new and deeply informed context.

The book will be published this month. You can pre-order ‘The Devil’s Chessboard’ here.