Archive for jeffmorley

Will the 2017 JFK documents tell us anything new?

Politico’s Bryan Bender follows up on WhoWhatWhy’s scoop about still-secret JFK records with a resounding “maybe.”

Asked whether there might be any significant revelations about Kennedy’s unsolved murder, Martha Murphy, head of the Archives’ Special Access Branch, told POLITICO last year, “I’ll be honest. I am hesitant to say you’re not going to find out anything about the assassination.”

Source: What the government is still hiding about the JFK assassination

Denied: the JFK records the government doesn’t want you to see

The invaluable WhoWhatWhy has posted a spreadsheet of the 3,600-plus assassination-related records that the U.S. government has never made public.

The existence of the 3,600 records was first reported in JFK Facts last May. The WhoWhatWhy document, obtained by FOIA specialist Michael Ravnitsky, advances the story by providing new details about what exactly the government does not care to share with the American people.  Read more

‘Eyewash’: How the CIA deceives its own workforce about operations

Senior CIA officials have for years intentionally deceived parts of the agency workforce by transmitting internal memos that contain false information about operations and sources overseas, according to current and former U.S. officials who said the practice is known by the term “eyewash.”

Source: ‘Eyewash’: How the CIA deceives its own workforce about operations – The Washington Post

Questioning Dale Myer’s JFK animation

Myers Critiqued

Myerr’s re-creation (left) compared to a photo from a near simultaneous moment in Dealey Plaza.

In WhoWhatWhy, Russ Baker and Milicent Cranor call into question Myer’s animated recreation of the first gunshot to hit President Kennedy. Myer’s work was used by ABC News special that affirmed the unpopular lone gunman theory.

Fair criticism?

 

‘The past doesn’t like to be changed’: sumptuous Stephen King adaptation of 11.22.63 

Since Al has cancer, he convinces Jake that he has to go back into the past and finish the work he’s started. He has files and research about all sorts of people implicated in the plot, from Lee Harvey Oswald to CIA operatives and Russian émigrés. The problem is, the past doesn’t like to be changed, and when Jake attempts it he is attacked by careening cars, falling chandeliers, and an army of cockroaches bent on his destruction.

Source: 11.22.63 review – sumptuous Stephen King adaptation bodes well for Hulu | Film | The Guardian

The implications of latest Morley v. CIA ruling

The latest Morley decision greatly simplifies the test for determining whether a FOIA plaintiff is entitled to receive attorney fees.

Source: MEMORANDUM ON MORLEY CASE OPINION BY COURT OF APPEALS

Why did James Angleton want to wait out the Warren Commission?

The short answer is I don’t know.

The long answer is that we are talking about one of the most pregnant moments in the Warren Commission’s efforts to obtain information from the CIA. It happened in March 1964. Read more

More on the KGB man and Oswald

About the recent post on KGB officer Nikolai Leonov’s encounter with Lee Oswald, former Warren Commission attorney David Slawson comments: Read more

Thanks and a note on the Morley v. CIA road ahead

Thanks all the positivity on the court’s decision.  I think Bill S. has quoted the essence of the decision, which is good news for FOIA requesters everywhere.  What’s gratifying is the court’s rather commensensical affirmation that people who want to know more about the CIA and the events of November 1963 are acting reasonably.

In addition, this court has previously determined that Morley’s request sought information “central” to an intelligence committee’s inquiry into the performance of the CIA and other federal agencies in investigating the assassination. Morley v. CIA, 508 F.3d 1108, 1118 (D.C. Cir. 2007). Under these circumstances, there was at least a modest probability that Morley’s request would generate information relevant to the assassination or later investigations.”

Unfortunately,, the archaic appellate process has delivered us back into the tender mercies of the oft-reversed Judge Leon. We are exploring possible remedies. If you have expertise in federal appellate court procedures, maybe you have some ideas.

I will keep you posted, if you keep posting the story of the court’s decision on your social media.

Bob Dylan on the death of JFK 

Bob Dylan accepted the “Tom Paine Award” from the National Emergency Civil Liberties Committee at a ceremony on December 13, 1963, shortly after the assassination of John F. Kennedy. According to those who were there “a drunken, rambling Dylan questioned the role of the committee, insulted its members as old and balding, and claimed to see something of himself (and of every man) in assassin Lee Harvey Oswald..”

Source: JFKCountercoup2: BOB DYLAN’S REMARKS

KGB man talks about his time with Oswald

As a historian of the Cold War, I found these comments by retired KGB officer  Nikolai Leonov, to be fascinating. Whatever you think of his ideological convictions,Leonov was an effective secret intelligence professional for decades, a foe that CIA men like James Angleton and Win Scott had to respect..

Morley v. CIA decision

Here is the decision of Judge Stephen Williams in the Morley v CIA lawsuit concerning certain long-suppressed CIA records related to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

 

Morley 3, CIA 0

A federal appellate court has again rejected the arguments of the Central Intelligence Agency in a long-running lawsuit over ancient but still-sensitive CIA files related to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

Jim Lesar

James Lesar, veteran FOIA litigator, prevailed over the CIA attorneys for a third time.

On Thursday, a three-judge panel in Washington D.C. unanimously denied the CIA’s claim that there is no “public benefit” to the disclosure of long-suppressed records of a deceased CIA officer involved in the events that led to the death of the liberal president on November 22, 1963.

“Where that subject is the Kennedy assassination, an event with few rivals in national trauma and in the array of passionately held conflicting explanationsshowing potential public value is relatively easy,” wrote Senior Circuit Judge Stephen Williams.

The records were forced into public view by a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit that I brought against the CIA in 2003. The records revealed for the first time that the officer received a Career Intelligence Medal in 1981, two years after stonewalling congressional investigators about what he knew of contacts in 1963 between accused assassin Lee Oswald and CIA-funded anti-Castro exiles in New Orleans.

Read more

Jennifer Lawrence as ‘Marita’: the story behind the coming film

Lawerence is re-teaming with American Hustle screenwriter Eric Warren Singer .

I’m looking forward to this for two reasons: Read more

‘Suspicious Minds,’ (why we believe conspiracy theories)

David writes:

“I HIGHLY recommend this very accessible, insightful, and well researched book: Suspicious Minds: Why We Believe Conspiracy Theories: Rob Brotherton.