Tag: ARRB

Dale Myers on the state of the JFK case

By setting up a series of straw men, adopting a supercilious tone, and ignoring new evidence, Dale Myers manages to unpleasantly restate the official theory of a lone gunman in a way that makes it less convincing than ever.

Fifty-two long years, and still nothing to exonerate Oswald or uncover the so-called “true conspirators.”

Source: JFK Files: Fifty-two years of coming to terms with Oswald

Myers is correct on one point: there is no proof beyond a reasonable doubt that any specific named individual conspired to kill President Kennedy. This factual statement also applies to Lee Oswald.

Enforce the JFK Records Act: Collect the foreign records about the assassination

Kerry In Cuba
Secretary of State John Kerry opens the U.S. Embassy in Havana on August 14, 2015.

The 1999 Final Report of the Assassination Records Review Board singled out President Clinton’s State Department of a lack of cooperation asserting it “obviously did not consider pursuit of foreign records about the Kennedy assassination to be a priority,“and “more of a hindrance than help“.

David S. Ferriero, the Archivist of the United States (AOTUS), has an ongoing duty to ensure that all assassination records are obtained before the provisions of the JFK Act fully expire.  Write his blog and tell him the State Department needs to come into compliance with the law. …

CIA may still have photos of Oswald in Mexico City

One mystery of JFK assassination story is why accused assassin Lee Oswald was not photographed when he visited the Embassy of the Soviet Union in Mexico City two months before President Kennedy was killed in Dallas.

Mexico City mystery man
The CIA thought he was Lee H. Oswald.

The CIA had three photographic surveillance bases to take pictures of visitors to the Embassy. Oswald visited the Embassy at least twice in an unsuccessful effort to obtain a visa. But the CIA says no photograph of Oswald was taken.

The photo to the right, which CIA personnel in Mexico City mistakenly linked to Oswald, depicted a man who was never conclusively identified.

In 1978 investigators from the House Select Committee on Assassinations …

A creative legal approach to clarifying the JFK story

Civl rights attorney Bill Simpich

A new legal approach to cracking the JFK assassination puzzle from civl rights attorney William Simplich.

“He considers the assassination cases to be a poorly understood area of civil rights violations. To preserve cold cases, he is preparing a proposed JFK Preservation of Evidence Act that would be applicable in both of these areas of the law and administered by a citizen panel similar to the ARRB.”

via JFK Lancer.

ARRB chairman says JFK investigation riddled with ‘too many holes’

John R. Tunheim, the federal judge in Minnesota who served from 1994 to 1998 as the chairman of the Assassination Records Review Board (ARRB), says in a television program to be aired this month that while the Warren Commission “did a thorough job,” the investigation of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination in 1963 was “somewhat primitive” and riddled with “too many holes.”

Former JFK investigator: Don’t hold your breath for 2017

As general counsel for the Assassination Records Review Board (ARRB) in the mid-1990s, Jeremy Gunn had unparalleled access to the government’s records on the JFK assassination. Last year he gave an interesting talk about “Seeking the Truth in the Kennedy Assassination” at the Center for Global Humanities at the University of New England in Portland, Maine.

Seeds of doubt: Gaeton Fonzi interviews Arlen Specter in 1966


Warren Commission Exhibit 903.
Arlen Specter demonstrates the
single-bullet theory in May 1964.

When young journalist Gaeton Fonzi interviewed former Warren Commission staff lawyer Arlen Specter in 1966, he expected the talented Specter to have ready answers to the questions which were then swirling around the medical aspects of the JFK case. Specter’s “single bullet theory” was under attack in such books as Edward Epstein’s Inquest, and in scholarly articles by Vincent Salandria in a legal journal (see here and here).

Fonzi would later write in his memoir The Last Investigation: “After those interviews with Arlen Specter, my belief in that Government would never be the same.”

JFK review board was thwarted on Marines’ assessment of Oswald

One of the most effective open government laws ever passed by the U.S. Congress was the JFK Records Act, passed 22 years ago in October 1992.

The implementation of the law, mandating the review and release of all records related to the assassination of President John Kennedy in 1963, was overseen by the Assassination Records Review Board, a forgotten federal agency that did a remarkable job uncovering what former New York Times reporter Phil Shenon has called “the hidden history of the Kennedy assassination.”

But the ARRB was stymied on one key group of records.

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