At Warren Commission conference, a Cuban militant tells his Oswald story

via Josh Mittledorf on VENITISM: THE JFK ASSASSINATION, an opinionated account of the AARC conference on the 50th anniversary of the Warren Commission, held in Washington last weekend.

“In the day’s high point,” he writes, “we heard a first-hand confirmation of CIA primacy in the plot…..”

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Why the liberal press ignored the 50th anniversary of the Warren Commission

The Irish Examiner‘s coverage of the 50th anniversary of the Warren Commission report was more comprehensive than the Washington Post‘s and better informed than the Boston Globe’s and more penetrating than Time magazine’s. It seems for the American journalistic profession, the noteworthy fact that a majority of Americans still reject the Commission’s obsolete conclusions is no longer worthy of much reflection.

A friend asks, “Why the lack of U.S. coverage?”

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Why the Warren Commission got scared of Castro

The Warren Commission didn’t get scared if Fidel Castro because of Lyndon B. Johnson’s chilling warning to Chief Justice Earl Warren about rumors that “if not quenched, could conceivably lead the country into a war which could cost 40 million lives.” Read more

Skeptics gather 50 years after Warren Commission

“Now anybody, anywhere can get access to the original record of the assassination, or most of it,” Morley said. “That has never been true over the past 50 years and it’s only started to be true recently. It’s only going to become more true as time passes.”

via Skeptics gather 50 years after Warren Commission report about JFK assassination – Nation – The Boston Globe.

How JFK pursued the ‘sweet approach’ to Cuba

At the Warren Commission conference in Washington this morning, Cuba scholar Peter Kornbluh gave a fascinating talk on how Kennedy pursued the idea of normalizing relations with Fidel Castro in 1963. In the bureaucracy this was known as “the sweet approach,” Kornbluh says. The idea was to lure Castro out of his alliance with the Soviet Union instead of overthrowing him.

“Kennedy had a change of heart after the missile crisis,” Kornbluh says. and he makes the case in his new book Back Channel to Cuba Kennedy pursued the idea right up through the last 72 hours of his life, Kornbluh says.

About the Warren Report: Bad faith of the CIA and FBI

Chris writes: “What you should know about the Warren Commission’s report is that it was marred (some would say invalidated) by the bad faith of the FBI and the CIA… Read more

CIA admits undercover officer lived in New Orleans

George Joannides, chief of CIA covert operations in Miami in 1963, also had a residence in New Orleans, according to the CIA.

In a court motion filed last week, the CIA acknowledged for the first time that deceased CIA officer George Joannides lived in New Orleans while handling contacts with an anti-Castro student organization whose members had a series of encounters with accused presidential assassin Lee Oswald in August 1963.

The unexpected admission came in arguments before a federal court judge about whether the CIA is obliged to pay $295,000 in legal fees incurred during my Freedom of Information Act lawsuit concerning certain 50-year-old JFK assassination records.

In a previous court filing, my attorney Jim Lesar argued that two documents released over CIA objections in 2008 were significant because they showed that Joannides’s espionage assignment took him to New Orleans where Oswald lived.

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About the Warren Report: why no index?

In response to Monday’s call for 140-word comments on the 50th anniversary, Cary writes,  ”What you need to know about the Warren Commission report is…

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JFK 3.0: Why the Warren Report is obsolete

From my new piece on Medium: “If data wants to be free, as some say, JFK assassination data insists upon it.”
 

‘What you should know about the Warren Commission report is that…’

Warren Commision

The birth of the story in question.

JFK Facts has more knowledgeable students of the JFK assassination story than any website I know of. So on the 50th anniversary of the publication of the Warren Commission report, I’m inviting regular commenters — and all readers — to submit a statement, no more than 140 words long beginning with the phrase, “What you should know about the Warren Commission’s report is that…”

Then you have 129 words left to express your opinion.

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The fading taboo against Warren Commission critics

“When it comes to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the list of important, seemingly credible public figures who count themselves as conspiracy theorists is long and impressive,” Phil Shenon writes in today’s Washington Post

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Jackie Kennedy didn’t believe the single bullet theory either

Another problem with the Warren Commission’s report just surfaced in Vanity Fair: First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy didn’t believe the single bullet theory on which the Commission’s findings depend. Neither did John and Nellie Connally. In other words, the Commission ignored the testimony of the three witnesses closest to the gunfire.

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What the Warren Commission didn’t know

The Assassination Archive and Research Center will hold a conference on the 50th anniversary of the report of the Warren Commission in Washington next week — and it is going to be great.

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Why Castro met with the Warren Commission

Fidel Castro, tormenter of empire

Investigators probing the assassination of President John F. Kennedy held a secret meeting with Cuban president Fidel Castro, according to Philip Shenon’s new book, “A Cruel and Shocking Act.

CBS News, The Hill, and the Daily Mail have touted the story of the previously unknown contact between the U.S. government and the revolutionary firebrand as newsworthy. It is.

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Missing witnesses: two African-Americans on the grassy knoll

Grassy knoll aftermath

This photo, taken about 30 seconds after the assassination of JFK, shows a Dallas policeman running toward the so-called “grassy knoll” where two young black people were having lunch.

A half-century ago, two young black people in Dallas found themselves eyewitnesses to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy — yet their voices have never been heard. Indeed, a half century later, even their names are unknown.

This young man and woman were sitting on the spot famously dubbed “the grassy knoll” on November 22, 1963. They had a front row seat for a key moment in 20th century U.S. history: the murder of a popular liberal president.

 

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