Missing witnesses: two African-Americans on the grassy knoll

Grassy knoll aftermath

This photo, taken about 30 seconds after the assassination of JFK, shows a Dallas policeman running toward the so-called “grassy knoll” where two young black people were having lunch.

A half-century ago, two young black people in Dallas found themselves eyewitnesses to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy — yet their voices have never been heard. Indeed, a half century later, even their names are unknown.

This young man and woman were sitting on the spot famously dubbed “the grassy knoll” on November 22, 1963. They had a front row seat for a key moment in 20th century U.S. history: the murder of a popular liberal president.

 

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The view from the Triple Underpass

On November 22, 1963, railroad worker S.M Holland was watching the presidential motorcade approach Dealey Plaza from a perch on top of a bridge known as The Triple Underpass.

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The trouble with the Warren Commmision

Historian Gerald McKnight, author of “Breach of Trust: How the Warren Commision Failed and Why,” talks to Len Osanic at Black Ops Radio in this video:

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CIA chief told RFK about two shooters in Dallas

RFK and John McCone

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy and CIA Director John McCone (photo credit: CIA)

Why did Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy believe that his brother President John F. Kennedy was the victim of a conspiracy, as his son recently said?

Did RFK have any evidence for his belief, asked readers of the widespread coverage of RFK Jr.’s comments?

It turns out RFK had it on good authority that two people were involved.

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‘The [Warren] report … has collapsed like a house of cards …’

“I think that the report, to those who have studied it closely, has collapsed like a house of cards, and I think the people who read it in the long-run future will see that. I frankly believe that we have shown that the [investigation of the] John F. Kennedy assassination was snuffed out before it even began, and that the fatal mistake the Warren Commission made was not to use its own investigators, but instead to rely on the CIA and FBI personnel, which played directly into the hands of senior intelligence officials who directed the cover-up.”

Senator Richard Schweiker on “Face the Nation” in 1976 Read more

Q&A with Howard Willens, Warren Commission defender

Howard Willens, former staff attorney on the Warren Commission, remains one of its most vigorous public defenders 50 years later. As I reported yesterday, he agreed to answer questions from JFK Facts via email. Because all of the questions were submitted at once, there were no follow up questions. In any case, my intent was not to conduct a hostile interrogation but to elicit his thoughts and hopefully start a dialogue. (I found his journal from 1964, which he has posted on his website, to be a valuable document for understanding the limitations of the Commission’s approach to its investigation.)

Now let’s hear from him. Read more

Top CIA officials were ‘not truthful’ with Warren Commission, former staffer says

Howard Willens

Howard Willens, Warren Commission defender.

Howard Willens, a former Warren Commission staffer, acknowledged in a an email interview with JFK Facts that deputy CIA director Richard Helms was “not truthful” with the Commission and there is “no doubt” that counterintelligence chief James Angleton did not cooperate with the inquiry into JFK’s assassination.

While vigorously defending the Commission’s conclusions, Willens admitted he was naive about the CIA. Asked about a passage in his journal from March 1964 in which he wrote that senior CIA officials “did not have an axe to grind” in the commission’s investigation, Willens acknowledged “my comments about the CIA were naive to say the least.”

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Waiting out the Warren Commission, the HSCA and … the American public?

Not sure anyone wants to hear from an “irresponsible fanatic” (I’ve been called worse things) — especially one who hardly followed the JFK controversy for 25 or so years after working for the House Select Committee on Assassinations in 1978, but I want to add to the point of a recent JFK Facts post: the CIA chose to wait out the Wareen Commisions

See: ‘Jim [Angleton] would prefer to wait out the Commission…’(See the June 7, 2014) 

They did the same to us at the HSCA.

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‘Jim [Angleton] would prefer to wait out the Commission…’

“Jim would prefer to wait out the Commission on the matter covered by paragraph 2…”

CIA’s Raymond Rocca, writing to Richard Helms regarding counterintelligence chief James Angleton’s desire to stonewall the Warren Commission on certain CIA materials passed to the Secret Service.
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Sen. Richard Russell, the first dissenter

 Speaking of “Six insiders who suspected a JFK plot,”

Len Osanic’s Black Op Radio drills down on the story of Insider #4, Georgia Senator Richard Russell, a conservative defender of racial segregation and a member of the Warren Commission.

Russell’s biographer dubbed him “the first dissenter” in the  JFK assassination story.

Watch:

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How the Warren Commission misrepresented JFK witnesses


JFK researcher Walt Brown talks to Len Osanic about the Warren Commission’s curious and selective use of witnesses, including:

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The hit man and the mobster: Jack Ruby and Santos Trafficante

Why did Jack Ruby kill Lee Oswald?

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The cinema of assassination as inspired by JFK

Hollywood’s cinema of assssination, as inspired by the death of JFK, takes two different forms: conspiratorial and sociopathic. Both will be on display at a multiplex near you later this year if and when Tom Hanks’s “Parkland” and Leonardo di Caprio’s “Legacy of Secrecy” open. Hanks’s hospital drama will depict JFK as the victim of a lone sociopath while DiCaprio’s mob flick will likely finger Carlos Marcello and other organized crime bosses.

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Those Kennedy Kards

The now poignant Kennedy Kards deck was published in early 1963 when the public infatuation with JFK had been revitalized by his statesmanship in the Cuban missile crisis of October 1962.

JFK was the Jack of Hearts, First Lady Jackie the Queen of Hearts, and Bobby Kennedy, the King of Diamonds.

“Long live the King, Queen and Jack,” proclaimed an informational card that came with the deck.

Within the year, the Jack of Clubs, Vice President Lyndon Johnson, would be president. Read more

What George de Mohrenschildt knew

I am a Patsy! – The Lost Tapes of George de Mohrenschildt from E2 Films on Vimeo.

From Shane O’Sullivan, director of the excellent documentary, “Killing Oswald,” and editor of Doug Horne’s fascinating interview with CIA photo analyst Dino Brugioni, comes another revelation: tapes of George de Mohrenschildt talking about his friend Lee Oswald.

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