In Miami, a muted response to historic change in Cuba policy

The Washington Post‘s Joel Achenbach reports from south Florida, Obama’s opening to Cuba has provoked little outrage in what was once a bastion of anti-Castroism.

“The biggest change in U.S. policy toward Cuba in half a century, an historic rapprochement — the end of the Cold War! — has not yet incited organized outrage at the level where people start pouring onto Calle Ocho. Something has changed here over the years — and the decades.”

via In Miami, a mixed and muted response to historic change in Cuba policy – The Washington Post.

When JFK secretly reached out to Castro

“The president had asked his speechwriter, Theodore Sorensen, for language that would open a door to the Cuban leader, although, as Sorensen later observed, the audience was a very tough anti-Castro group.’”

via When J.F.K. Secretly Reached Out to Castro – NYTimes.com.

Jackie Kennedy and the anguish of gun violence

“Now a half century later, it is time for all the Jacqueline Kennedy letters to be available for historians, allowing for a more full and accurate understanding about one of the most dramatic moments in 20th century U.S. history. Efforts by the Kennedy family to keep these letters at bay only mute our comprehension of what truly happened on that tragic day in Dallas and the kind of psychological damage that gun violence can wreak on the lives of innocent survivors.”

via The anguish of Jackie Kennedy – CNN.com.

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U.S. and Cuba to normalize relations frozen since JFK was president

President Obama reaches out to Cuba

“Todos somos Americanos.” We are all Americans.

With those words, President Obama made an epic and overdue announcement today: the United States and Cuba will normalize relations that were broken off in January 1961 as President John F. Kennedy took office. “These 50 years have showed that isolation has not worked,” the president said.

Not only will the United States open an embassy in Havana, it will release three Cubans imprisoned for decades on trumped-up spying charges. The Cubans will release U.S. government contractor Alan Gross, held for five years on trumped-up charges, and a previously unknown U.S. intelligence agent imprisoned for many years in Cuba.

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Public Interest Declassification Board cites JFK Records Act as a model

In a new study of the U.S. government’s dysfunctional declassification system, the Public Interest Declassification Board (PIDB) cited the JFK Records Act of 1992 as a model for effective release of information that interests the public. That’s why the PIDB should make sure that the CIA declassifies 1,100 assassination-related documents by October 2017, their scheduled release date Read more

Larry King on Jim Garrison: ‘He’s not a charlatan’


In this archive footage, famed CNN personality Larry King talks about how he was an aspiring radio announcer in Miami in the late 60s when he interviewed New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison, then in the midst of his investigation into JFK’s assassination. Read more

Oswald’s coffin: Robert Oswald’s lawsuit illuminates the buried truths of the JFK story

Oswald's Coffin

Where the accused assassin was laid to rest.

The global coverage of the sad story of Lee Harvey Oswald’s brother suing Baumgardner funeral home for his brother’s coffin demonstrates the enduring public interest in the smallest details of the JFK story.

While custodians of the conventional wisdom in the U.S. media turn up their noses at such fare, the UK’s Daily Mail uses the story to float the notion that Oswald was “in fact a covert U.S. intelligence agent,” a proposition for which there is a good deal of circumstantial evidence.

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Rachel Maddow traces CIA torture program back to JFK investigation

CIA ignores own lessons in developing torture program, says MSNBC host Rachel Maddow.

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CSI JFK: The chain of custody for ‘the magic bullet’

The so-called “magic bullet” (Don Roberdeau).

At the close of his book, You Are The Jury, David Belin, attorney for the Warren Commission, cited 10 major contentions as the foundation of the case against Lee Harvey Oswald.

I examine these 10 points in my recent Op-Ed News article, How the Warren Commission Covered Up JFK’s Murder. In this article I address the chain of custody for the so-called “magic bullet,” otherwise known as Commission Exhibit 399 (or CE399). According to the Warren Commission, this bullet wounded both President Kennedy and Governor John Connally.

With unwarranted confidence, Belin asserted:

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From JFK to torture, the CIA obstructs accountability

From Bryan Bender of the The Boston Globe:

“The CIA has a long history of blocking congressional oversight of its activities. ‘I think there is a pattern,’ said John Prados, a senior fellow at the National Security Archive at George Washington University and author of ‘The Family Jewels: The CIA, Secrecy, and Presidential Power.’”

via Decades later, seeking to shed light on CIA’s conduct in congressional inquiry of JFK assassination – Nation

Fidel Castro’s reaction to the assassination of JFK

“Everything is changed. Everything is going to change. The United States occupies such a position in world affairs that the death of a President of that country affects millions of people in every corner of the globe. The cold war, relations with Russia, Latin America, Cuba, the Negro question… all will have to be rethought. I’ll tell you one thing: at least Kennedy was an enemy to whom we had become accustomed. This is a serious matter, an extremely serious matter.”

via Fidel Castro Reaction to Kennedy Assassination in Cuba | New Republic.

Dick Russell on Richard Case Nagell


This is a helluva story that always left me scratching my head. Russell, perhaps best known as Jesse Ventura’s wordsmith, can explain it better than anyone.

Voice of America: JFK’s assassination still reverberates

From a news source closely aligned with the U.S. government, there is acknowledgement of reasonable doubt.:

“Many theories have been discredited. But in a story last year marking the 50th anniversary of JFK’s death, The Associated Press reported that “thousands of pages of investigative documents remain withheld from public view” and could set light on ‘nagging mysteries of the assassination.’”

via Kennedy Assassination Reverberates 51 Years Later.

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What Newsweek avoids: Fifty plus one: the unfinished JFK story

On the 51st anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy we can see how Americans revisit this traumatic event, a political wound with resulting cultural scars, and we find an unfiinished story, a wound unhealed.

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Who did Jackie Kennedy think killed her husband?

Jackie Kennedy’s private thoughts about Dallas

A few things are known for sure. First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, 34 years old and dressed in a U.S.-made knock off of a pink Chanel suit, was looking at her husband’s face with concern from inches away when a bullet shattered his head.

After that horrible moment, Jackie had to pull herself together, give Jack the funeral he deserved. She assumed that her husband’s enemies had killed him. A week after the assassination, she and her brother-in-law Robert Kennedy confided in a friend, William Walton. They said they believed Dallas was the work of a high-level domestic plot, meaning JFK’s enemies on the political right.

But mostly Jackie didn’t want to think about who killed Jack. She was close to insane with grief, clutching to her brother-in-law who was devastated as well. She was often suicidal. And so Jackie fades from the crime story. The men who dominate the discussions of JFK conspiracy theories are often united in ignoring the views of the woman closest to the crime.

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