Tag: Warren Commission

Philip Shenon on Oswald: ‘Perhaps the FBI or Congress or both should send investigators back to Mexico’

Philip Shenon’s 2013 book, A Cruel and Shocking Act, reconstructed the story of the assassination of President Kennedy with an unusual focus: not on the perennial question of conspiracy but rather on a narrower issue: the destruction of evidence that followed in the wake of JFK’s murder on November 22, 1963.

Students of the JFK story already know much of the dismal tale, and Shenon adds story-telling verve and amazing detail to the trail of destruction, some of it human.

The book opens with the unnerving untold story of Charles William Thomas, a State Department official in Mexico City. In the mid-1960s, Thomas picked up on information about Lee Harvey Oswald’s famous trip to the Mexican capital in October 1963, six weeks before the president was gunned down in Dallas. Thomas insisted his superiors re-investigate the story. They responded by destroying his career. Thomas went on to commit suicide. The government later admitted error and compensated the family without much explanation of what had actually happened.

You have to wonder: If Oswald was a lone maniac, why destroy the man’s career for calling for a second look? You don’t have to agree with Shenon’s position on the larger conspiracy question to be impressed by the detail he brings to this story.

Shenon’s latest piece in Politico revealed that David Slawson, a Warren Commission investigator — and defender — now says the commission was deceived by the CIA and FBI and that Oswald may have had accessories in Mexico City. …

The core logic of the Warren Commission

A faithful reader calls attention to an interview about the logic of the Warren Commission as expounded by one of the artists behind a new (and excellent) graphic treatment of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas on November 22, 1963.

Dan Mishkin doubts a JFK conspiracy because its “hard to place him [Oswald] as a member (or dupe) of any conspiracy, largely because of the timing of his getting the job at the Texas School Book Depository and the announcement of the motorcade route.”

No matter what you think of those two factual points (and they are worthing thinking about), Mishkin’s “Warren Commission Report: A Graphic Investigation into the Kennedy Assassination” is a compelling telling of the JFK story.

Here’s how Mishkin explained the evolution of his thinking:

Politico’s report on Oswald’s alleged JFK threat overlooked one thing

David Slawson
David Slawson

A faithful reader calls attention to this passage in Phil Shenon’s POLITICO Magazine article on the former Warren Commission staff David Slawson and his change of heart about the Commission’s conclusions:

“He [Slawson] was outraged, in particular, when I showed him an eye-popping June 1964 letter from FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover to the commission that described how Oswald, in an outburst at a Cuban diplomatic compound in Mexico City during his trip there, had reportedly been overheard threatening, ‘I’m going to kill Kennedy.’

Anthony Summers on David Slawson, the newest JFK conspiracy theorist

I think David Slawson’s repudiation of the Warren Commission report in Politico magazine is important. Anthony Summers, best-selling biographer and JFK investigator, disagrees.

In an email from Ireland Summers writes that Slawson’s new interpretation of Kennedy’s assassination is: “interesting but no headline — and, especially given that it comes from a lawyer, contains an oddly unsafe quote.”

“I now know,” Slawson is quoted as saying, “that Oswald was almost certainly not a lone wolf.”

ARRB chairman says JFK investigation riddled with ‘too many holes’

John R. Tunheim, the federal judge in Minnesota who served from 1994 to 1998 as the chairman of the Assassination Records Review Board (ARRB), says in a television program to be aired this month that while the Warren Commission “did a thorough job,” the investigation of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination in 1963 was “somewhat primitive” and riddled with “too many holes.”

Howard Willens weighs in on RFK’s suspicions of conspiracy

Howard Willens, former Warren Commission staffer, has responded to Philip Shenon’s article in Politico about Attorney General Robert Kennedy being a “conspiracy theorist” and my post, “Why RFK refused to swear there was no conspiracy.”

In a new post at HowardWillens.com, Willens says the dispute should be broken down into three questions:

Oswald charges could have been dismissed, says defense attorney

Bill Simpich

At an event sponsored by JFK Lancer in Dallas next month, veteran San Francisco defense attorney Bill Simpich will cut to the proverbial chase in the JFK assassination story.

“Simpich will address the FBI report issued two weeks following the assassination [of President John F. Kennedy], and the evidence that the Warren Report itself served largely as a cover-up exercise to support the FBI report….”

What does Simpich, an experienced litigator, say about the ancient complexities of this particular criminal case?

 

In memory of Ed Sherry

The esteemed JFK researcher Malcolm Blunt writes:

“My closest buddy is gone; the ‘Frog’ {aka Ed Sherry) }is no more, and what a great loss it is, not just for me but for all of us who knew him. I first met Ed Sherry twenty one years ago in Dallas (where else?) and we became firm friends from the very start.”

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