Tag: grassy knoll

Where did the gunshot that killed JFK come from?

Grassy Knoll 11/22/63

This photograph, courtesy of Duncan MacDonald, taken several minutes after President Kennedy was shot to death, shows a crowd of people, including newsman Robert MacNeil (later host of MacNeil-Lehrer Newshour), rushing to look at the railroad tracks and parking lot overlooking the motorcade route on November 22, 1963.

There is no disputing that they rushed to that area, known as “the grassy knoll,” because they thought one of the gunshots had come from there. No gunman was ever found there.

Grassy knoll target practice on 11.20.63?

Reader David Regan asks if anyone has information regarding the story below, in which the Dallas police allegedly encountered a group of men engaging in “target practice” on the Grassy Knoll on November 20, 1963: Has anyone come across confirmation on this? “Target Practice in Dealey Plaza” — from “Mafia Kingfish,” by John Davis (paperback Signet Books edition, 1989):

Missing witnesses: two African-Americans on the grassy knoll

Grassy knoll aftermath
This photo, taken about 30 seconds after the assassination of JFK, shows a Dallas policeman running toward the so-called “grassy knoll” where two young black people were having lunch.

A half-century ago, two young black people in Dallas found themselves eyewitnesses to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy — yet their voices have never been heard. Indeed, a half century later, even their names are unknown.

This young man and woman were sitting on the spot famously dubbed “the grassy knoll” on November 22, 1963. They had a front row seat for a key moment in 20th century U.S. history: the murder of a popular liberal president.

 

‘At least two of the shots…came from behind me’

“I have read the Warren Commission Report in its entirety and dozens of other books as well, I am sorry to say the only thing I am absolutely sure of today is that at least two of the shots fired that day in Dealey Plaza came from behind where I stood on the knoll, not from the book depository.”

–Cheryl McKinnon,a journalism major who witnessed the assassination of President Kennedy. McKinnon went on to become a newspaper reporter for the San Diego Star News. …

Top 5 JFK stories of the week

Rifle discovered

This week brought a burst of interest in the tagged posts on George Hickey, the late Secret Service Man who was falsely accused of firing the fatal shot that killed President Kennedy. I was glad to see people are getting the true story.

The bogus “Secret Service Man Did It” conspiracy meme (it doesn’t deserve to be called a theory) has persisted since the publication of a foolish book called Mortal Error in the 1980s. The meme was revived for the 50th anniversary of JFK’s assassination by REELZ Channel and an Australian cop who should know better. And Malcolm Gladwell should definitely know better.

JFK Facts: setting the record straight since 2013. 

Lost evidence: the original Orville Nix film

Orville Nix, a native of Dallas, took this film of JFK’s assassination. But as his granddaughter Gayle Nix Jackson explains on her website, this is NOT the camera original copy of the film. This is a copy of the film Nix gave to the FBI. The original of the film has never surfaced. It if it did, it might contain new visual information about the crime scene — or it might not. The loss of the original shows the lack of seriousness on the part of the FBI in investigating Kennedy’s death.

 

JFK Facts Top 5: Stories with legs

Grassy knoll aftermath
Cops runs to the grassy knoll

 

Readers responded to Sunshine Week in Washington by making our story about secrecy around JFK records the favorite story of the week. In self-referential twist, last week’s Top 5 Countdown was the second most popular story of the week thus landing in this week’s countdown. And for the 2nd week in a role the story of cops gravitating to the grassy knoll in the aftermath of JFK’s assassination came in at number 5. As we say in the journalism business, that story has legs.

In memory of Earl Golz

Earl Golz
Earl Golz, reporter

A faithful reader writes,

“Earl Golz may have been a ‘journeyman reporter and editor’ in his time at the Austin Statesman-American, but he was, of course, much more than that in JFK community.”

Dallas police chief talks about the gunfire that killed JFK

Rare video from Vince Palamara, via JFK Lancer:

 

Peter Dale Scott’s straightforward interview with Jesse Curry, chief of the Dallas Police Department who was riding at the front of presidential motorcade on November 22, 1963. Curry talks about his observations at the scene of the crime.

Who was Jesse Curry? Spartacus Educational has a good summary.

Ken O’Donnell on grassy knoll shots

“I told the FBI what I had heard [two shots from behind the grassy knoll fence], but they said it couldn’t have happened that way and that I must have been imagining things. So I testified the way they wanted me to. I just didn’t want to stir up any more pain and trouble for the family.”

– Kennedy aide Kenneth O’Donnell, quoted by House Speaker Thomas P. “Tip” O’Neill Jr. in “Man of the House,” p. 178. O’Donnell was riding in the Secret Service follow-up car with Dave Powers, who was present and told O’Neill he had the same recollection.

Scroll to Top