Tag: Dealey Plaza

Robert Groden: his JFK life depicted in Dutch documentary

And here is the real fascination of this film. It’s just not that simple. It’s not as easy as dismissing Robert Groden as a nutcase. He’s weird. He’s way unusual. He’s obsessive as hell. But how do we know — Do we know? — that obsession is automatically or always wrong or destructive? What if he’s right?

From Dallas Observer: Dutch Documentary Portrays Dallas Conspiracy Guy 

Where did the gunshot that killed JFK come from?

Grassy Knoll 11/22/63

This photograph, courtesy of Duncan MacDonald, taken several minutes after President Kennedy was shot to death, shows a crowd of people, including newsman Robert MacNeil (later host of MacNeil-Lehrer Newshour), rushing to look at the railroad tracks and parking lot overlooking the motorcade route on November 22, 1963.

There is no disputing that they rushed to that area, known as “the grassy knoll,” because they thought one of the gunshots had come from there. No gunman was ever found there.

The origins of Mannlicher-Carcano bullets

Mannlicher Carcano, JFK, rifle
Where did the bullets come from?

An intriguing tidbit from a faithful reader about the bullet that allegedly killed President Kennedy.

“Recently, I was reading the post CSI JFK: The Chain of Custody for “the magic bullet.” Bob Prudhomme posted a reference to “frangible range bullet for the Mannlicher-Carcano.” I didn’t know what that meant. I had to look it up. In doing so, I stumbled across a Web site about the ammunition (not the rifle).
Scroll down to the heading- “Non-Italian Military Rounds.”
It says:

Grassy knoll target practice on 11.20.63?

Reader David Regan asks if anyone has information regarding the story below, in which the Dallas police allegedly encountered a group of men engaging in “target practice” on the Grassy Knoll on November 20, 1963: Has anyone come across confirmation on this? “Target Practice in Dealey Plaza” — from “Mafia Kingfish,” by John Davis (paperback Signet Books edition, 1989):

Four photographers remember November 22

Four young photographers working for the daily newspaper Dallas Times Herald in 1963 were assigned to the team tasked with capturing the President’s much-anticipated visit to Dallas. They’ll be talking about their memories of that day on Tuesday, November 17 at 7 pm at The Sixth Floor Museum in Dallas.

Tickets are $25.

 

Missing witnesses: two African-Americans on the grassy knoll

Grassy knoll aftermath
This photo, taken about 30 seconds after the assassination of JFK, shows a Dallas policeman running toward the so-called “grassy knoll” where two young black people were having lunch.

A half-century ago, two young black people in Dallas found themselves eyewitnesses to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy — yet their voices have never been heard. Indeed, a half century later, even their names are unknown.

This young man and woman were sitting on the spot famously dubbed “the grassy knoll” on November 22, 1963. They had a front row seat for a key moment in 20th century U.S. history: the murder of a popular liberal president.

 

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