JFK is just one chapter in the History of the CIA

The JFK story is just one reason why you’ll want to take my online course, History of the CIA: 1947 to Today.

The course starts the week after the July 4 weekend with my lecture, “From OSS to CIA to JFK:” It tells the story how the marriage of the Ivy League and British Intelligence resulted in the birth of the CIA.

Stay tuned.

 

4 comments

  1. Nathaniel Heidenheimer says:

    I would have opened with the combination punch of Chrisopher Simpson’s absolutely essential The Splendid Blonde Beast and Lisagor and Lipsius’ A Law Unto Themselves. Both books deal in the unique role of Sullivan And Cromwell, employer of Dulles brothers, not merely in terms of US intelligence history but also in the much broader themes of US foreign policy and imperialism.

    Of course segregating US intelligence history from US imperialism is a cottage industry in itself these days, we need only compare Noam Chomsky to real live historians.

    Intelligence history needs to be reintegrated, otherwise it just adds to the False Mystery.

    • Ronnie Wayne says:

      Thank you for the tip sir. Any direction regarding Dulles or Angleton is appreciated. I realize you are broaching a bigger picture, but to one here Dulles role in whatever happened in the JFK Assassination is still worth learning about.

      • Ronnie Wayne says:

        Looking for these books today amazon prompted me to sign up early for the release of David Talbot’s “The Devil’s Chessboard”, about Dulles, coming out in October. I was ecstatic having just finished “Brothers”. (Why had I not read it before!). Brothers was the best big picture book I’ve read since Unspeakable or Destiny Betrayed (which it gives a newer perspective on, RE Walter Sheridan).
        I can’t wait, but I’ll have to.

      • Paul Turner says:

        Yes, when it may be said that the Warren Commission should have been the Dulles Commission.

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