Dick Russell on Richard Case Nagell


This is a helluva story that always left me scratching my head. Russell, perhaps best known as Jesse Ventura’s wordsmith, can explain it better than anyone.

6 comments

  1. Nagel was insane.

    http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/nagell1.htm

    A secret internal CIA document described him as “a crank because he is mentally deranged” and noted he never worked for the agency.

    • marc bell says:

      You don’t have credibility among people that do deep research. Heads of 3 letter agencies are insane and Trump isn’t too well either.”The world is run by insane people with insane agendas” John Lennon

  2. Jonathan says:

    Nagell told Russell that Oswald was involved in a plot to kill JFK. To which I say baloney.

    The man buried in Oswald’s grave has never been shown to be a member of any plot. That man was a remarkably solo operator. Sylvia Odio’s story of the three visitors to her house might cause one to believe the man known as Oswald was a conspirator, but it’s easier to believe the “Oswald” who visited Odio was an Oswald look-alike.

    The story of Nagell causes me to believe he was delusional. Not to say the CIA or the KGB wouldn’t have use for such an individual.

  3. Ramon F Herrera says:

    Near minute 59′ Dick Russell mentions Antonio Veciana’s “in his deathbed” confession. It is clear that Mr. Russell is not a JFKFacts reader.

    “Reports of my death have been widely exaggerated”

    -Antonio Veciana

  4. Quentin Schwinn says:

    The first edition of The Man Who Knew Too Much was the first modern book on the assassination that I have read. I got it from the public library in Lorain, Ohio sometime in the later half of the 1990s. It opened my eyes and started me on a long journey of inquiry that has been absolutely fascinating and terrifying at the same time. A second book I got from the library at the same time was Oswald and the CIA by John Newman. These two books together were pivotal in my journey for the truth. I am now reading the second edition and it is still priceless.

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