The relevance of the JFK story in the age of mass surveillance

“We hear a lot reasons why things can’t be made public, that the NSA needs to surveil to stop people from attacking America. We hear a lot of explanations like that. What if we took all that secrecy away from the Kennedy assassination. What would we see?”

I recently took up that question with Chuck Ochelli, the host of an online radio program called “The Ochelli Effect.”

The show opens with some spooky audio effects. The conversation really begins around 4:00.

BTW, Ochelli calls himself “the blind JFK researcher.”

2 comments

  1. JSA says:

    Jefferson Morley hits the nail on the head when he says that the only people who seem to be opposed to the release of the CIA’s final still secret JFK assassination related files are those who have something to lose: reputation, budgeting, power, etc. But those who feel these 50-year old documents should be released are just exercising common sense.

    I have to wonder: If the JFK assassination was just a lone person (Oswald) who did it, then WHY is there still any secrecy involved, unless it poses a threat to some key institutions: perhaps CIA, FBI, maybe some of the military, and some politicians (families) who have historical reputations that would be damaged? It must be a huge elephant in the room as well, because otherwise I think we would have had full disclosure by now. Again, this is just my common sensical approach to the problem.

    Anyone who argues national security is involved doesn’t seem to understand that to continue to hide these files in the long run causes more damage to the credibility of the national government than to hide them in the interest of protecting some arcane “national security” details.

  2. Gerry Simone says:

    Well said JSA.

    Remember what JFK said too:

    “We decided long ago that the dangers of excessive and unwarranted concealment of pertinent facts far outweighed the dangers which are cited to justify it.”

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