Tag Archive for Win Scott

An epic non-fiction novel of the CIA

As a former longtime employee of CIA, I can attest that this book conveys a true picture of the goings on within the agency.”

— From Martha Hanchulak’s review of “Our Man in Mexico: Winston Scott and the Hidden History of the CIA.” My first book describes in lucid detail how the CIA’s top man in Mexico viewed President Kennedy’s assassination in 1963: with deep suspicion.

It’s an epic non-fiction novel of the CIA.

Read more

A story from inside the CIA

“Mexico City was the Casablanca of the Cold War–a hotbed of spies, revolutionaries, and assassins. The CIA’s station there was the front line of the United States’ fight against international communism, as important for Latin America as Berlin was for Europe. And its undisputed spymaster was Winston Mackinley Scott, chief of the CIA’s Mexico City station from 1956 to 1969,

from Our Man in Mexico: Winston Scott and the Hidden History of the CIA

You can buy it on Amazon.com, or You can also buy an autographed copy of “Our Man in Mexico” from the me, the author. Just drop me a line here. Read more

How the stupid JFK conspiracy debate misleads us

The estimable Andrew Sullivan has weighed in on the JFK conspiracy question. He claims Oswald Killed Kennedy, Period. So has Slate’s Fred Kaplan. He argues that even the best JFK conspiracy theories are bunk.

Let me say I think Sullivan and Kaplan are among the very best online journalists we have. I’m glad to say I count them as friendly acquaintances. I’m sorry to say I also think they have fallen victim of JFK denialism: the very Washington impulse to dismiss troubling evidence in the JFK story. Read more

A JFK conversation with KPFA’s Project Censored

On Friday I spoke with Mickey Huff and Peter Phillips, hosts of the the Project Censored program on KPFA radio in Berkeley, California. I enjoyed the conversation because it escaped the straightjacket of “conspiracy” for a more wide-ranging–and realistic–discussion of the media and the intelligence failure of November 22, 1963.

Listen up.                        Read more

Shenon to NPR: ‘The destruction of evidence begins within hours of the president’s death’

I saw JFK author Phil Shenon, author of “A Cruel And Shocking Act,” on TV this morning. Then I listened to him on NPR this afternoon.

He said some smart things to NPR’s Dave Davies about the JFK assassination story, even if I don’t agree with all of them.

Read more

Former New York Times reporter highlights CIA surveillance of Oswald

Philip Shenon’s appearance on Face the Nation today is a breakthrough in JFK assassination coverage in three ways.

As the author of the new book, A Cruel and Shocking Act: The Secret History of the Kennedy Assassination, Shenon is credited with breaking news about the JFK story. While the former New York Times reporter pledges allegiance to the old lone gunman theory (de riguer for a member of the Washington press corps), his new information clarifies troubling facts that many historians and journalists have preferred to avoid. Read more

WaPo asks: Why did CIA wiretap a reporter in the 1960s? Answer: Because of his JFK reporting

The Washington Post‘s Ian Shapira had a fascinating piece over the weekend about a son pursuing his father’s journalistic legacy.

Jim Scott, 64, a retired Navy public relations officer who lives in Maryland, wants to know why the CIA wiretapped his father, Paul Scott, a syndicated columnist and investigative reporter in Washington in the 1960s. Scott was half of “The Allen-Scott Report,” a popular syndicated column that ran in some 300 papers nationwide.

One reason why Scott was bugged by the CIA: his JFK reporting.

Read more