Tag Archive for Win Scott

JFK Most Wanted: Dave Phillips’ CIA operations files

David Phillips

David A. Phillips, chief of CIA anti-Castro covert operations in 1963

David Phillips was a failed actor turned expatriate newspaper publisher in Santiago, Chile when he was recruited into the CIA in the early 1950s. He made his mark fast. In 1955, he won a Distinguished Intelligence Medal, one of the agency’s highest honors, for mounting deceptive radio broadcasts in the CIA’s overthrow of the democratically elected government of Guatemala in 1954.

After that his CIA career took off. With Howard Hunt, Phillips served as propaganda chief in the CIA’s failed effort to invade Cuba at the Bay of Pigs In April 1961. When he was assigned to Mexico City in 1962, station chief Win Scott described him as “the finest covert action officer I have ever met.”

After JFK’s assassination, Scott was not so complimentary and I suspect the reason why was Oswald’s curious handling of Oswald. .(I tell the story in my biography of Scott, Our Man in Mexico. Buy it here.)

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‘JFK Declassified:’ What the History Channel overlooks

Declassified documents reveal that Oswald met with the Cold War enemies of the United States, both Russia and Cuba, only eight weeks before JFK’s assassination.

This claim, made by the producers of new History Channel docu-series JFK Declassified: Tracking Oswald, is not new. The claim may just be promotional hype for the series which begins tonight and runs through May 30. But, from long experience with JFK documentaries, my fact checking antennae are tingling.

It is not too soon to say the History Channel’s claim is potentially misleading.

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Another gift idea: the JFK story as seen by a top CIA officer

As a former longtime employee of CIA, I can attest that this book conveys a true picture of the goings on within the agency.”

— From Martha Hanchulak’s review of “Our Man in Mexico: Winston Scott and the Hidden History of the CIA.” My first book describes in lucid detail how the CIA’s top man in Mexico viewed President Kennedy’s assassination in 1963: with deep suspicion.

It reads like a novel but every word is true. Available now on Amazon.comRead more

Oct. 10, 1963: Six top CIA officers discuss Lee Harvey Oswald among themselves

Fifty three years ago today, a man named Lee Harvey Oswald came to the attention of a group of senior CIA officers in Langley, Virginia. Oswald had recently visited the Cuban consulate and Soviet Embassy  in Mexico City. A CIA wiretap captured a man identifying himself as “Oswald.”

The CIA officers conferred about Oswald and his actions and signed off on a cable about him. They are identified on the declassified CIA cable whose authenticity is not disputed.

CIA Oswald Cable

They were: assistant deputy director (ADDP) Tom Karamessines; Soviet Russia division counterintelligence officer Stephan Roll; liaison officer Jane Roman, Special Projects Group (SPG) officer Ann Egerter; chief of the WH/3 desk (Mexico )”John Scelso” aka John Whitten; and chief of operations for Western Hemisphere, William J. Hood.

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 ‘The Spider’ who nearly wrecked the CIA  

Christopher Dickey has a deft introduction to the career of James Angleton in The Daily Beast.

The biography that I am now writing about Angleton (due for publication in 2017) will have more of the story,

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Our Man in Mexico: ‘Really great’

Rob writes: “I just finished Our Man in Mexico and wanted to tell you it was really great.”

Our Man in Mexico“Excellent on Win Scott’s FBI to OSS to CIA history; excellent on the Kennedy assassination issues; and just a really enjoyable bio. You have some of the most succinct and informative expositions of the various facets of the story that I have come across. So, kudos!”

Rob is right, and that’s not my bias speaking. Here’s what the Wall Street Journal said about Our Man in Mexico.

You can order the book in hardcover or paperback here.

From a 5-Star Amazon review of Our Man in Mexico

A reader’s take on Our Man in Mexico:

“What a pleasure to read a fact-based, well researched, and completely documented book that covers, not only the JFK assassination, but the early soldiers of the WW II – OSS. Many of these same OSS people became the CIA’s senior management team by 1963. Unlike most books on these subjects, Mr. Morley allows the reader to draw their own conclusion(s). There are no wild-eyed, self-perpetuated, illogical theories here – only substantiated and referenced facts.”

“I strongly recommend Our Man in Mexico to any serious OSS/CIA/JFK historian or researcher …”

Tell me more about Our Man in Mexico. 

Our Man in Mexico: ‘Your book is factual, without subterfuge, without hyperbole’

Happy Labor Day. On your day off, you should support this site by buying a copy of my book. One reader of Our Man in Mexico said, ‘Your book is factual, without subterfuge, without hyperbole’

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Former CIA employee endorses ‘Our Man in Mexico’

former employee called my book about Winston Scott, chief of the CIA’s Mexico City station from 1956 to 1969,  “a realistic picture” of the agency.

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‘Your book is factual, without subterfuge, without hyperbole’

A reader’s responds  to Our Man in Mexico.

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‘Hands down, one of the best books that I have ever read’

Hands down, one of the best books that I have ever read

Order your copy of “Our Man in Mexico” here. Its a great holiday gift for that history buff on your list.

 

DId the CIA destroy an Oswald tape?

Probably.  A  tape recording of man identifying himself as Oswald was probably destroyed in January 1986. This question, prompted by a comment from reader JSA, is a natural follow up to the question, “Did the CIA track Oswald before JFK was killed?”

Some thing the tape may still exist but I think the evidence suggests otherwise. What is certain is that contrary to the false claims of the CIA, the tape existed after November 22, 1963.
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An epic non-fiction novel of the CIA

As a former longtime employee of CIA, I can attest that this book conveys a true picture of the goings on within the agency.”

— From Martha Hanchulak’s review of “Our Man in Mexico: Winston Scott and the Hidden History of the CIA.” My first book describes in lucid detail how the CIA’s top man in Mexico viewed President Kennedy’s assassination in 1963: with deep suspicion.

It’s an epic non-fiction novel of the CIA.

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A story from inside the CIA

“Mexico City was the Casablanca of the Cold War–a hotbed of spies, revolutionaries, and assassins. The CIA’s station there was the front line of the United States’ fight against international communism, as important for Latin America as Berlin was for Europe. And its undisputed spymaster was Winston Mackinley Scott, chief of the CIA’s Mexico City station from 1956 to 1969,

from Our Man in Mexico: Winston Scott and the Hidden History of the CIA

You can buy it on Amazon.com, or You can also buy an autographed copy of “Our Man in Mexico” from the me, the author. Just drop me a line here. Read more

How the stupid JFK conspiracy debate misleads us

The estimable Andrew Sullivan has weighed in on the JFK conspiracy question. He claims Oswald Killed Kennedy, Period. So has Slate’s Fred Kaplan. He argues that even the best JFK conspiracy theories are bunk.

Let me say I think Sullivan and Kaplan are among the very best online journalists we have. I’m glad to say I count them as friendly acquaintances. I’m sorry to say I also think they have fallen victim of JFK denialism: the very Washington impulse to dismiss troubling evidence in the JFK story. Read more