Tag Archive for WFAA

Dr. Robert McClelland: ‘a story he feels compelled to share’

The doctor who tried to save JFK’s life shows a memento of a terrible day to WFAA-TV in Dallas. On this occasion, he appropriately chose not share what he has said elsewhere at length: The nature of the president’s wounds indicated he had been shot from the front and the back. Read more

Station wagon that carried Oswald’s gun up for auction

Ruth Paine's 1955 Bel-Air Station Wagon

Ruth Paine’s 1955 Bel-Air station wagon (credit: Jason Whitely, WFAA)

“What’s unique about this is this vehicle actually transported his rifle back to Dallas from where Oswald had been living in New Orleans,” said Farris Rookstool III, a JFK historian. Read more

O’Reilly not contesting the facts of his JFK fib

Bill O’Reilly seems to have muzzled himself. The publication of David Corn’s “Bill O’Reilly Has His Brian Williams Problem,” followed by the re-publication of JFK Facts’ Jan. 30, 2013, story “Investigators tape exposes Bill O’Reilly’s JFK fib” has done what some thought impossible: The embattled Fox News host has stopped blustering.

Read more

One man’s encounter with Oswald

From a faithful reader in Dallas:

“On Saturday October 4, the Sixth Floor Museum’s 2014 Living History Series, presented a talk by Pierce Allman, who was the program director at WFAA Radio in Dallas on November 22, 1963. Allman was in Dealey Plaza at the time of JFK’s assassination, and was one of the first media representatives inside the Texas School Book Depository (TSBD) after the shooting.

Read more

Radio reporter to talk about his Oswald encounter

“Former WFAA-Radio Program Director Pierce Allman had no assignment to cover President John F. Kennedy’s visit to Dallas on November 22, 1963. At the last minute, Allman decided to walk to nearby Dealey Plaza to see the presidential motorcade. Read more

Oswald’s wallet, Part II: Was the ‘Hidell’ ID card planted?

In my April 21 article, I asked the question Who found Oswald’s Wallet?

In this article I pose the question:  Was a phony identification card for “Alek HIdell” inserted into the wallet after it was found?

Listen here to Dallas Police Department Officer Gerald Hill discuss the capture of Lee Harvey Oswald on November 22, 1963. [Editor’s note: to cut to the chase, go to 3:17 in the audio file.]

Listen for what Hill does not say: Read more

Geraldo Rivera changed America

(THE VIDEO REFERRED TO IN THIS PIECE HAS BEEN REMOVED FOR TECHNICAL REASONS)

Last year, Chris Vogner, movie critic for the Dallas Morning News, reminded us how the first broadcast of Abraham Zapruder’s film of JFK’s assassination on ABC TV in March 1975 changed American popular culture.

Read more

Who found Oswald’s wallet?


The story of the murder of Dallas police officer J. D. Tippit on November 22, 1963, took an unexpected twist this past year.

Read more

Coming soon: Inside Oswald’s wallet

Seen at the crime: Dallas police officers handling Lee Oswald’s wallet

From Bill Simpich, author of the revelatory new book State Secret, comes another piece of original research into JFK’s assassination:

Read more

NRA denies licensing a JFK commemorative rifle

Let’s commemorate the murder of a president with few rounds of friendly fire.

A Colorado company, American Legacy Firearms is selling a limited edition “Dallas Heritage Rifle,” engraved with a picture of the Kennedy Memorial in Dallas, according to Dallas TV station WFAA.

A red, white and blue NRA sticker on a flier for the fully functional Mossberg .30-30 rifle describes the firearm as an “official NRA licensed product.”

But Jacqueline Otto, of NRA public affairs, said via email that the JFK commemorative rifle “is not an NRA licensed product.”

Licensing is a big business for the gun group. In 2011, the NRA took in $122 million in “program service income,” more than double the $59 million it received in grants and contributions, according to an IRS filing.

President Kennedy was killed by rifle fire on November 22, 1963, as his motorcade passed through downtown Dallas. This November will mark the 50th anniversary of the crime whose causes remain in dispute.

Bad taste?

A WFAA reader survey is finding that 54 percent or respondent agree the JFK memorial rifle is inappropriate. Another 46 percent of respondents think it is not inappropriate.

Stephen Hunter, gun expert and author of “The Third Bullet,”a fictional thriller about JFK’s assassination, says, commemorative guns “are a species of firearm kitsch which appeals to some people. I am not one of them. I find it somewhat grotesque but hardly offensive. It’s really just silly.”

For gun fans, says Hunter, “the associations with the lever action .30-30 are quite positive and patriotic, because of the iconographic usage in western movies and the long hunting heritage.”

As a practical matter, he said the Mossberg is “slow moving and old fashioned,” more ubiquitous in cowboy movies than in real life.

The official story is the JFK was killed on November 22, 1963, by a gunshot from Mannlicher-Carcano, a cheap and relatively inaccurate firearm, a hypothesis Hunter finds implausible.

In “The Third Bullet,” Hunter suggests that Kennedy was killed by a shot from a .264 Winchester Magnum, a more powerful and accurate weapon than either the .30-30, or the Mannlicher-Carcano.

—-

Recommended:

“Stephen Hunter goes ballistic. ‘The Third Bullet’ rethinks the JFK story,” (JFK Facts, April 17 2013)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘Don’t confuse me with facts’

John McCaa of WFAA-TV in Dallas voices a common complaint: Too many JFK conspiracy theories. Read more