Tag Archive for surveillance

How CIA surveillance tracked Oswald on his way to Dallas

WaPo Oswald

CIA paid close attention

The most important revelations in the new JFK files concern the CIA (and possibly NSA) surveillance of accused assassin Lee Harvey Oswald.

A Senate investigator’s memo, released in December 2017, gives the exact date that the surveillance of Oswald began: November 11, 1959.

This is one of the most important JFK records released in the Trump era, so its details are worth understanding.

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JFK Files Watch: Will Gina Haspel destroy assassination records like she destroyed torture tapes?

Gina Haspel

Gina Haspel, document destroyer

As the April 26 deadline for release of the last of the JFK assassination files approaches. President Trump will be hearing from his new CIA director Gina Haspel on the issue of what can and cannot be made public.

What will Haspel say? Read more

FBI wide shut: One key JFK file that remains redacted

Redacted FBI Oswald doc

Released in full. Not

I spent Friday at the Archives II in College Park Maryland in search of this Dec. 10, 1963 FBI report on the Bureua’s handling of the Lee Harvey Oswald file before JFK was killed.

At right is the version available on the Mary Ferrell site. The accompanying RIF sheet states the document is “released in full.”

I pulled the document at Archives II and it is not “released in full.” It remains heavily redacted. These black marks are a reminder that the Trump administration has yet to enforce the JFK Records Act. Read more

FLASH CANCELLED: What one of the last JFK files will tell us about Oswald

FBI memo

A less redacted FBI on Oswald

In response to my post, “FBI wide shut”, a faithful reader points out there is a “minimally redacted” version of a key FBI memo about accused assassin Lee Harvey Oswald. Read more

The surveillants: more U.S. intelligence officers who watched Oswald

Oswald Under Surveillance

Bill writes:

“I am appreciating your insistence that Oswald was under surveillance, pursuant to LINGUAL, AMSPELL, and LIENVOY.”

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‘You can make an iron-clad argument that the CIA knew very much about Oswald’

A reader writes perceptively about the “conspiracy v. gross negligence” question in the JFK story. In an email, he explains, perhaps better than I have, why I emphasize this issue.

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What Politico doesn’t know about the JFK files

Politico’s Thomas Maier mines the new JFK files to competently retell the oft-told but still-disturbing story of how respectable CIA officials and murderous Mafia dons tried and failed to assassinate Cuban leader Fidel Castro in the early 1960s.

Along the way, Maier drops this claim:

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The documentation that Oswald was under surveillance

“Oswald was under counterintelligence surveillance from 1959 to 1963,” Morley said. “Everywhere he went he touched CIA collection operations, code-named secret intelligence operations, whose product was delivered to [counterintelligence chie James] Angleton.”

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Oswald lived in a surveillance state

In response to my post on Oswald under surveillance, a Twitter friend asked if surveillance was the reason why Oswald rented a room under a fake name (“O.H. Lee”) six weeks before the assassination of JFK.

I said no.  Read more

How the CIA tracked Oswald 

From my story in AlterNet

The latest batch of JFK assassination files, released December 15, illuminate a story that the CIA still denies: the surveillance of accused assassin Lee Harvey Oswald in the years before he shot and killed President John F. Kennedy.

Source: The New JFK Files Reveal How the CIA Tracked Oswald | Alternet

The surveillance of Oswald led the CIA to use him in an operation against the Fair Play for Cuba Committee in the summer of 1963.

Tomorrow: Oswald and the Fair Play for Cuba Committee

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CIA conceals files on wiretapped newsman who broke a big JFK story

Paul Scott

Paul Scott, investigative reporter (Credit: Jim Scott)

In this Washington Post piece, Jim Scott tells the story of how the CIA wiretapped his father, news reporter Paul Scott, for decades. In the 1960s, Paul Scott and his partner Robert Allen wrote a syndicated column on Washington politics that was driven, not by punditry, but by investigations.

One reason Scott was targeted: his JFK reporting.

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El Pais on ‘mysteries hidden in the secret JFK assassination files’

Jan Martinez Ahrens’ piece in EL PAÍS, the leading newspaper of Spain (machine translated) shows why foreign coverage of the JFK files release was more realistic and less propagandistic than the U.S. coverage.

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Pre-order now: ‘The Ghost: The Secret Life of CIA Spymaster James Jesus Angleton’

James Angleton

James Angleton, chief of the CIA’s Counterintelligence Staff.

At the Future of Freedom Foundation’s recent conference on “The National Security State and JFK,” I previewed one of the best stories from my forthcoming biography of James Angleton: How Lee Harvey Oswald became enmeshed in the Angleton’s legendary “mole hunt” in which he pursued a KGB spy in the ranks of the CIA.

If Oswald was a “lone nut,” as cliché would later have it, he was that rare isolated sociopath of interest to the CIA’s Counterintelligence Staff.

The Ghost: The Secret Life of CIA Spymaster James Jesus Angleton: Jefferson Morley: Amazon.com: Books

Angleton and the CIA’s illicit mail surveillance program

Although this account does not mention James Angleton, the CIA Counterintelligence Chief (1954-74) was the man who expanded and oversaw the opening of the mail of U.S. citizens for nearly 20 years. In 1977, the Justice Department decided not to indict him.

Source: The Justice Department refused to prosecute CIA for illegal surveillance

CIA may still have photos of Oswald in Mexico City

One mystery of JFK assassination story is why accused assassin Lee Oswald was not photographed when he visited the Embassy of the Soviet Union in Mexico City two months before President Kennedy was killed in Dallas.

Mexico City mystery man

The CIA thought he was Lee H. Oswald.

The CIA had three photographic surveillance bases to take pictures of visitors to the Embassy. Oswald visited the Embassy at least twice in an unsuccessful effort to obtain a visa. But the CIA says no photograph of Oswald was taken.

The photo to the right, which CIA personnel in Mexico City mistakenly linked to Oswald, depicted a man who was never conclusively identified.

In 1978 investigators from the House Select Committee on Assassinations Read more