Tag Archive for Roger Stone

Crowdsourcing JFK: The Madeleine Brown story

Is Madeleine Brown’s story true and verified?

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Most popular JFK Facts stories of 2013

Here are the best read JFK Facts stories of 2013 in order of popularity.

Jack Ruby’s ex-flame

1) Ex-flame says Jack Ruby ‘had no choice’ but to kill Oswald (March 21, 2013)

“He was not in love with the Kennedys and he did NOT like Robert Kennedy by no means.”

2) Reelz Channel to air discredited JFK theory (Nov. 2, 2013)

“There is no evidence for this bogus theory: No eyewitness testimony or photographic evidence supports the claim…”

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Parsing Nixon and Ruby: a progress report

I’ve gotten some useful comment on my question, “Did Richard Nixon know Jack Ruby?”

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Fact check: Did Richard Nixon know Jack Ruby?

Who was ‘Jack Rubenstein of Chicago?’

Paul Hoch begs to differ with me on Roger Stone. I think Stone’s upcoming book on LBJ and JFK’s assassination should be taken seriously because of Stone’s contacts and experience. Hoch finds Stone to be an unreliable analyst who is prone to exaggeration.

Hoch cites one point of fact — about Richard Nixon and Jack Ruby — where he thinks Stone is misinformed. His argument, endorsed by Gary Mack of the Sixth Floor Museum, provides a useful test of Stone’s credibility.

I have tremendous respect for Paul Hoch, who knows the JFK case better than almost anyone and has taught me a great deal about bad evidence. But in this case, I think he his mistaken, and Stone is probably right.

Here’s why:

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Stone on Nixon: he ‘never overtly said “LBJ did it” but…’

“Nixon liked a dry martini and he liked to talk politics. He was circumspect and never overtly said “LBJ did it” but he did say a number of things that more than indicate he believed this.” — Roger Stone, Republican political consultant.

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Why Roger Stone’s JFK book has to be taken seriously

Let’s talk about power: Richard Nixon and Roger Stone.

Roger Stone is the first JFK assassination author to have worked in the White House and among the few who have personal acquaintances with JFK’s sucessors.

As a former aide to President Reagan and confidante of RIchard Nixon, Stone brings unique practical experience and personal contacts at the highest levels of American politics to a subject that has often been written about by people with neither.

Stone’s background doesn’t mean that his interpretation of November 22, 1963, is necessarily correct, but he cannot be dismissed as “conspiracy theorist” who is deluded about the realities of American politics and power.

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Roger Stone’s JFK book scores in Amazon pre-orders

Jacob Engels in the East Orlando Post says the Republican political operative’s upcoming book “The Man Who Killed Kennedy” ranked first in pre-orders in the “politics and policy” category of the online bookseller. I don’t know about #1, but the book is currently ranked fifth.

The pre-orders are  good sign for the former aide to President Nixon who makes the case for Lyndon Johnson as the mastermind of JFK’s assassination. Stone says his book “is the first real distillation of the facts by a White House insider,” which he says, accurately, distinguishes his from other “LBJ done it” books. Stone also conducted extensive interviews with Nixon and former Attorney General John Mitchell about the JFK story, neither of whom spoke publicly on the subject. That also distinguishes Stone’s book.

 

GOP consultant: Nixon hinted that he thought LBJ killed JFK

Roger Stone, right-wing conspiracy theorist

Roger Stone, a Republican political operative famed for his hardball tactics, is publishing a book arguing that Lyndon Johnson organized the assassination of President Kennedy. And he claims he has evidence to prove it. We’ve heard that line before, so I’m skeptical.

The most interesting disclosure Stone has made so far concern his conversations with former President Richard Nixon. As the Daily Beast reported:

“According to Stone, Nixon “never flatly said who was responsible [for Kennedy’s death]. But he would say, ‘Both Johnson and I wanted to be president, but the only difference was I wouldn’t kill for it.”

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