Tag Archive for Phil Shenon

The CIA’s modified limited hangout: Politico on the spy chief who lied about JFK

RFK and John McCone

“Did your guys do it?” RFK asked CIA director John McCone after JFK was killed. (photo credit: CIA)

 

Phil Shenon continues his intrepid reporting on the assassination of JFK with a report in POLITICO Magazine.on the findings of the CIA’s in-house historian that former director John McCone covered up key information from assassination investigators.

The CIA, it turns out, has confirmed that yet another senior agency official–McCone–withheld significant information from  the Warren Commission. The story is accompanied by the agency’s assurances–and Shenon’s–that the Warren Commission’s conclusions about who killed JFK were correct in every respect.

The weakness of this claim should be obvious. If the Warren Commission investigation was compromised from the top by CIA officers–and now even the agency belatedly agrees it was–then confidence in its findings must be reduced. Logically, one cannot impugn the investigation without impugning its findings.

But the CIA is willing to try.

The modified limited hangout

The CIA is now playing defense against the widespread and accurate public perception that it is not being forthcoming about JFK’s assassination. The agency, for example, retains 1,100 JFK assassination records that it may or may not release as mandated by law in October 2017.

Some of these files are potentially explosive. See “7 JFK files the CIA still conceals.”

The CIA’s cooperation with Shenon, along with its release last month of presidential daily briefings from the Kennedy era, are intended to show the public that the agency is being candid, willing to admit mistakes, and so on.

To be sure,the agency’s very limited disclosures are something of a contribution to the record of JFK’s assassination.

A  November 25, 1963, briefing for President Johnson, was revealing. It showed what the CIA wasn’t telling the White House. The agency didn’t care to share just how much senior officers knew about the obscure Lee H. Oswald before President Kennedy was killed.

The Politico story shows that McCone dutifully went along with another aspect of the CIA cover-up. He knew about–but did not tell the Warren Commision about–the CIA’s conspiracies to kill Castro, leader of the communist revolution in Cuba.

So we can now say, without fear of contradiction, that the top three officers of the CIA did not cooperate with the investigation of JFK’s murder.

Deputy director Richard Helms and counterintelligence chief James Angleton took the lead in the CIA cover-up and McCone followed.

The CIA is engaged in what one conspirator in the Watergate era called “the modified limited hangout.” This is the Washington art of disclosing lesser crimes and misdemeanors in service of hiding greater wrongdoing.

Now in 2015

This is a sorry episode in American history that invites–nay, demands–public suspicion.

The Politico story tells us that Director John McCone’s control of the CIA in 1963 was nominal. It confirms that senior CIA officials agreed they should not cooperate with law enforcement efforts to investigate President Kennedy’s murder. And it shows that CIA officials today–52 years later!–feel the need to manage the problem of secrecy around JFK’s assassination. Fifty two years later.

The good news is that when Washington officials with something to hide go into “modified limited hangout” mode, they are usually in trouble, and frequently subject to more embarrassing disclosures.

The bad news is that “perception management,” which is what the CIA is now engaged in, is often successful.

The JFK acid test will come in October 2017. That’s when the CIA is supposed to release those 1,100 documents. As Politico and JFK Facts have reported, those documents could be embarrassing for the agency.

Politico’s mistake

Shenon makes one significant mistake in his piece where he writes:

“Robert Kennedy’s friends and family acknowledged years later that he never stopped fearing that Castro was behind his brother’s death.”

This is not factually supported. From the moment his brother was attacked,  Bobby Kennedy suspected anti-Castro Cubans and/or organized crime figures were responsible.

With hours of the assassination, RFK met personally with McCone. He asked McCone if CIA people were behind his brother’s murder. McCone said no.

A few days later, Bobby and Jackie Kennedy told a friend, William Walton, that they believed JFK was the victim of a domestic, not foreign, conspiracy.

In fact, as David Talbot’s book Brothers, shows in detail Bobby’s conspiratorial suspicions rarely, if ever, settled on JFK’s enemies on the left. Bobby and Jackie asked William Walton to tell high-level contacts in Moscow that, despite Oswald’s leftist politics, they did not hold the Soviet Union responsible for events in Dallas.

In an email, Talbot wrote, “Phil Shenon continues to recycle the myth — long propagated in CIA circles — that Fidel Castro was behind the JFK assassination. He now adds another piece of disinformation, asserting that Robert Kennedy also fell for this CIA propaganda line. This is completely false. I interviewed over 150 close friends, colleagues and family members of Bobby Kennedy, including Kennedy administration officials and insiders, for my book. NONE of them indicated to me that Castro was among Bobby’s leading suspects in the assassination of his brother.”

“Instead, they said that RFK immediately focused on the CIA and its ANTI-Castro operation as the source of the plot against President Kennedy. My sources included close advisors of Bobby Kennedy like Adam Walinsky, Frank Mankiewicz, Ed Guthman, Richard Goodwin — as well as assassination researchers with whom Bobby Kennedy met during his secret search for the truth.”

Which only makes sense. If top CIA officials blocked a full investigation of the murder of a sitting president, they had something to hide. Bobby Kennedy knew that in the 1960s. And, now a half century later, we know that CIA officials still have something to hide: the 1,100 documents scheduled for release in 2017, especially the “7 JFK files the CIA still keeps secret.”

 

 

 

 

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Did Bobby Kennedy think Fidel Castro was behind JFK’s assassination?

No, he did not. Robert F. Kennedy suspected organized crime and CIA-backed Cuban exiles might have been complicit in his brother’s death. He did not suspect the Cuban communist leader.

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Oswald in Mexico City:  Shenon and the Twist Party

Cruel and Shocking ActBill Kelly digs deep into an old story:

Central to Shenon’s thesis is a Mexico City Twist Party, which he learned about from some of the recently released records of State Department mid-level diplomat Charles William Thomas, whose suicide is said to be related to the failure of the government to act on the information he provided about the Twist Party and its possible association to the assassination.

Source: JFKcountercoup: A Cruel and Shocking Twist

Which is the more plausible JFK conspiracy theory? Readers respond

Two weeks ago, I posted a conspiracy theory survey asking readers to choose between the competing interpretations of two JFK Facts authors:. Robert Morrow, who posits a CIA-military plot from within the U.S. government, and Phil Shenon, who suggests Lee Oswald had pro-Castro Cuban accessories.

Which conspiracy theory won?

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Phil Shenon’s cruel and shocking misinterpretation

Phil Shenon

Phil Shenon,

Phil Shenon and I agree on at least a few things. In any resolution of the mysteries surrounding the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Mexico City will undoubtedly be important. The investigation into what happened there in 1963 was, for some reason, seriously curtailed by the U.S. government. The government has, since then, fought tooth and nail to keep the full story about what happened there secret.

While I have never met Shenon, I have spoken with him several times by telephone. I first heard from him when he called me around 2011. He introduced himself as a reporter for Newsweek Magazine. He said he was working well in advance on an article for that magazine for the 50th anniversary of JFK’s murder. He wondered whether I would be willing to talk about the HSCA’s investigation in Mexico City. I agreed to speak with him. Read more

A JFK Facts debate about the CIA: Shenon v. Morrow

CIA JFK Phil Shenon

Phil Shenon

On one side you have Phil Shenon, a former New York Times reporter and author of the book, A Cruel and Shocking Act. In an exclusive Q& A interview with JFK Facts earlier this year, Shenon pointed a finger at Cuba.

In response, Robert Morrow, a well-informed JFK author, aruges that JFK’s right-wing enemies in his own government were responsible for the murder in Dallas.

Who’s argument do you find more credible?

Vote in the JFK Facts poll on the next page Read more

Slawson: Oswald had accessories, not co-conspirators

David Slawson, former Warren Commission staffer who told Politico Magazine he has changed his mind about the commission’s conclusion, writes to say his position has been slightly misinterpreted. He does not believe there was a conspiracy to kill the president but he does think Lee Harvey Oswald had accessories.  Read more

Howard Willens corrects my mistakes

Howard Willens writes via email to correct a couple of mistakes in my Nov. 12 post, “Howard Willens weighs in on RFK’s suspicions of conspiracy.”  Let me quote him in full.

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POLITICO is the latest to pick up on JFK Facts story

POLITICO has picked up on a story that I first reported on JFK Facts in May 2013.

In a Magazine story headlined, “Was RFK a JFK Conspiracy Theorist?” (Spoiler alert: Yes), former New York Times reporter Phil Shenon writes: Read more

The fading taboo against Warren Commission critics

“When it comes to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the list of important, seemingly credible public figures who count themselves as conspiracy theorists is long and impressive,” Phil Shenon writes in today’s Washington Post

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Readers defend DiEugenio, shred Shenon

After I commented on Jim DiEugenio’s CTKA essay on The State of the JFK Case: 50 Years Out, I heard  from more than one reader who took exception to my defense of Phil Shenon’s JFK book,  “A Cruel and Shocking Act.”

One reader writes:

“Shenon’s book is another limited hang-out. After 50 years, that’s not progress. If the book had come out in the 1970s, it might be more significant. It contains a few juicy tidbits of ‘new’ information, but the overall substance of the book is misleading”

Another says: Read more

DiEugenio on the state of the JFK case

James DiEugenio, author

James DiEugenio, author and prolific contributor to the Citzens for Truth About the Kennedy Assassination Web site, has published “The State of the JFK case: 50 Years Out,” which makes some timely points on which I think everyone can agree.

I disagree with DiEugenio’s harsh assessment of Philip Shenon’s JFK book, “A Cruel and Shocking Act.” He calls the book a “disgraceful,” “travesty,” and an “apologia.” I wonder how he would describe a truly bad book. Such epithets scant the very interesting discoveries in Shenon’s reporting, including:

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Fact check: ‘Parkland’ director overlooks JFK secrecy

Peter Landesman, director of ‘Parkland,” recently spoke in error to the Washington Post about secrecy and the JFK assassination.

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Shenon to talk about the secret history of the Kennedy assassination

The former New York Times reporters talks about his new important book, “A Cruel and Shocking Act,”  at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia tomorrow, November 18. Read more

Talbot: ‘We’ll never know’ has become a self-fulfilling prophecy

The founding editor of Salon.com, David Talbot, takes on the New Yorker and the New York Times for their JFK assassination coverage, saying the “CIA and New York Times are still lying to us.”

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