Tag Archive for Our Man in Mexico

Why did the CIA’s Angleton want to cut off questions about Oswald?

In response to my recent post on a declassified April 1972 CIA memo ordering that “no defector or source” be asked about Lee Harvey Oswald, a faithful reader asks:

Where is April 1972 in the Nosenko chronology? Was there a time at which saner CIA people simply told Angleton to back off from his Nosenko-KGB theories?

The answer is that Angleton was motivated both by his interest in Nosenko and his desire to block CIA people from questioning the dubious official story of Oswald as a lone assassin about whom the agency knew little.

In fact, as Angleton knew better than anyone, the CIA had monitored Oswald’s movements, politics, personal life, and foreign contacts for four years before JFK was killed.

The other relevant question is, “Where is April 1972 in the Oswald chronology?” Read more

The JFK Facts podcast: Talking to CIA officers and Ronald Reagan’s JFK theory

Our fourth podcast (now downloadable!) about all things JFK in which we talk about:

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 ‘The Spider’ who nearly wrecked the CIA  

Christopher Dickey has a deft introduction to the career of James Angleton in The Daily Beast.

The biography that I am now writing about Angleton (due for publication in 2017) will have more of the story,

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From a 5-Star Amazon review of Our Man in Mexico

A reader’s take on Our Man in Mexico:

“What a pleasure to read a fact-based, well researched, and completely documented book that covers, not only the JFK assassination, but the early soldiers of the WW II – OSS. Many of these same OSS people became the CIA’s senior management team by 1963. Unlike most books on these subjects, Mr. Morley allows the reader to draw their own conclusion(s). There are no wild-eyed, self-perpetuated, illogical theories here – only substantiated and referenced facts.”

“I strongly recommend Our Man in Mexico to any serious OSS/CIA/JFK historian or researcher …”

Tell me more about Our Man in Mexico. 

Our Man in Mexico: ‘Your book is factual, without subterfuge, without hyperbole’

Happy Labor Day. On your day off, you should support this site by buying a copy of my book. One reader of Our Man in Mexico said, ‘Your book is factual, without subterfuge, without hyperbole’

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Former CIA employee endorses ‘Our Man in Mexico’

former employee called my book about Winston Scott, chief of the CIA’s Mexico City station from 1956 to 1969,  “a realistic picture” of the agency.

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‘Your book is factual, without subterfuge, without hyperbole’

A reader’s responds  to Our Man in Mexico.

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What can I do to help JFK Facts?

Comment and question from a new JFK Facts reader:

“Fascinating website. Thank you for your important work.I’m a political science graduate and history buff and would like to help any way I can.”

My answer:
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An epic non-fiction novel of the CIA

As a former longtime employee of CIA, I can attest that this book conveys a true picture of the goings on within the agency.”

— From Martha Hanchulak’s review of “Our Man in Mexico: Winston Scott and the Hidden History of the CIA.” My first book describes in lucid detail how the CIA’s top man in Mexico viewed President Kennedy’s assassination in 1963: with deep suspicion.

It’s an epic non-fiction novel of the CIA.

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A JFK conversation with KPFA’s Project Censored

On Friday I spoke with Mickey Huff and Peter Phillips, hosts of the the Project Censored program on KPFA radio in Berkeley, California. I enjoyed the conversation because it escaped the straightjacket of “conspiracy” for a more wide-ranging–and realistic–discussion of the media and the intelligence failure of November 22, 1963.

Listen up.                        Read more

Shenon to NPR: ‘The destruction of evidence begins within hours of the president’s death’

I saw JFK author Phil Shenon, author of “A Cruel And Shocking Act,” on TV this morning. Then I listened to him on NPR this afternoon.

He said some smart things to NPR’s Dave Davies about the JFK assassination story, even if I don’t agree with all of them.

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