Tag Archive for LBJ

Why the Warren Commission got scared of Castro

The Warren Commission didn’t get scared if Fidel Castro because of Lyndon B. Johnson’s chilling warning to Chief Justice Earl Warren about rumors that “if not quenched, could conceivably lead the country into a war which could cost 40 million lives.” Read more

Those Kennedy Kards

The now poignant Kennedy Kards deck was published in early 1963 when the public infatuation with JFK had been revitalized by his statesmanship in the Cuban missile crisis of October 1962.

JFK was the Jack of Hearts, First Lady Jackie the Queen of Hearts, and Bobby Kennedy, the King of Diamonds.

“Long live the King, Queen and Jack,” proclaimed an informational card that came with the deck.

Within the year, the Jack of Clubs, Vice President Lyndon Johnson, would be president. Read more

6 Washington insiders who suspected a JFK plot

Jackie Kennedy’s private thoughts about Dallas

Defenders of the semi-official theory of JFK’s assassination sometimes suggest that anyone who disagrees is deluded or dishonest. Dale Myers and Gus Russo have dubbed the benighted souls “the conspirati,” a term intended to convey disdain for those allegedly emotionally needy or intellectually incompetent people who doubt the claim that one man killed JFK for no reason.

The problem with this trope, alas, is the facts. There were plenty of astute observers of American power in 1963 who rejected the official theory of a “lone nut” and concluded President Kennedy had been killed by his enemies.

Here are six six U.S. government insiders in 1963 who suspected a JFK was killed by a conspiracy.

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Crowdsourcing JFK: Madeleine Brown debunked

In response to my call for crowdsourcing Madeleine Brown’s story about Vice President Johnson attending a party the night before the assassination of JFK and saying the Kennedys would never embarrass him again, I received no information to corroborate Brown’s story.

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Crowdsourcing JFK: The Madeleine Brown story

Is Madeleine Brown’s story true and verified?

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Lady Bird Johnson was delighted by Jefferson Davis

A glimpse of another time in America. This is a tour of the University of Texas campus as conducted in 1943 by Future First Lady of the United States, otherwise known as Lady Bird Johnson.

(From Home Movie #9:  YouTube.)

Nov. 27, 1963: Johnson invokes JFK in speech to Congress

 

In President Johnson’s address to a joint session of Congress five days after JFK’s assassination, he declared, “let us continue,” an echo of Kennedy’s inaugural injunction, “let us begin anew.”

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Fox News on a Dallas travesty

Has anybody noticed that the conservative Fox News network is more open minded about the JFK assassination story than its liberal competitors?

The embedded player above isn’t working. So click on this sympathetic report on James Tague, a Dallas man who suffered a superficial injury from a gunshot that missed President Kennedy’s limousine on November 22, 1963. Fifty years later, Tague has not been invited to the official ceremony commemorating the anniversary of Kennedy’s death in Dallas.

The liberal media isn’t much interested in Tague’s remarkable story but Fox News is.

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What LBJ and ‘Breaking Bad’ have in common

From Ian Couch in The New Yorker.

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Parsing Nixon and Ruby: a progress report

I’ve gotten some useful comment on my question, “Did Richard Nixon know Jack Ruby?”

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Why Roger Stone’s JFK book has to be taken seriously

Let’s talk about power: Richard Nixon and Roger Stone.

Roger Stone is the first JFK assassination author to have worked in the White House and among the few who have personal acquaintances with JFK’s sucessors.

As a former aide to President Reagan and confidante of RIchard Nixon, Stone brings unique practical experience and personal contacts at the highest levels of American politics to a subject that has often been written about by people with neither.

Stone’s background doesn’t mean that his interpretation of November 22, 1963, is necessarily correct, but he cannot be dismissed as “conspiracy theorist” who is deluded about the realities of American politics and power.

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Was Nixon referring to JFK’s assassination when said this about LBJ?

I don’t think so.

Billy Sol Estes leaves the stage; claimed LBJ killed JFK (and others)

Billy Sol Estes, cover boy for complex crimes

Billy Sol Estes, the infamous Texan con man who made multiple visits to prison after his complex web of mortgage fraud and agriculture swindles came to light in the early 1960s, died May 14, in Granbury, Texas, at age 88. (As if on cue, Mother Nature unleashed a tornado on Granbury the very next day, killing six people.)

Among Estes’ legacies: the allegation that Lyndon Johnson orchestrated the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

 

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GOP consultant: Nixon hinted that he thought LBJ killed JFK

Roger Stone, right-wing conspiracy theorist

Roger Stone, a Republican political operative famed for his hardball tactics, is publishing a book arguing that Lyndon Johnson organized the assassination of President Kennedy. And he claims he has evidence to prove it. We’ve heard that line before, so I’m skeptical.

The most interesting disclosure Stone has made so far concern his conversations with former President Richard Nixon. As the Daily Beast reported:

“According to Stone, Nixon “never flatly said who was responsible [for Kennedy’s death]. But he would say, ‘Both Johnson and I wanted to be president, but the only difference was I wouldn’t kill for it.”

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Jan. 14, 1963: JFK dowplayed Cuba as he prepared for State of the Union

JFK signsOn Monday morning, January 14, President John F. Kennedy woke up prepared to give his third State of the Union address on Capitol Hill. He would never give another.

The past few days had been spent in intense preparation. JFK had shaped the address to focus on managing the Western coalition arrayed against the Soviet Union while proposing a three-year $10 billion tax cut to sweeten prospects for his liberal agenda on Capitol Hill. Read more