Tag Archive for LBJ

6 Washington insiders who suspected a JFK plot

Jackie Kennedy’s private thoughts about Dallas

Defenders of the semi-official theory of JFK’s assassination sometimes suggest that anyone who disagrees is deluded or dishonest. Dale Myers and Gus Russo have dubbed the benighted souls “the conspirati,” a term intended to convey disdain for those allegedly emotionally needy or intellectually incompetent people who doubt the claim that one man killed JFK for no reason.

The problem with this trope, alas, is the facts. There were plenty of astute observers of American power in 1963 who rejected the official theory of a “lone nut” and concluded President Kennedy had been killed by his enemies.

Here are six six U.S. government insiders in 1963 who suspected a JFK was killed by a conspiracy.

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Listen in on LBJ and Hoover talk about Warren Commission

Audio flashback: On November 29, 1963, President Lyndon Johnson and FBI Director J Edgar Hoover discussed how to investigate the mysterious assassination of President Kennedy. (H/T DVP and

Allen Dulles and the making of the Warren Commission

Dan Hardway offers another gem of historic audio to our discussion of how Allen Dulles came to be named to the Warren Commission. He cites this phone call that President Johnson made to Allen Dulles on November 29, 1963, informing him he would be on the Commission.

Listen to the conversation here:

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RFK recommends Allen Dulles for a civil rights mission

Listen to this fascinating telephone call in June 1964 between President Lyndon Johnson, Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy and former CIA director Allen Dulles.

In the call, LBJ and RFK prevail upon Dulles to serve as the president’s personal emissary to Mississippi after disappearance of the three civil rights workers.

Which is the most telling exchange between the two men?

(H/T Jean, Dan, and Jim)


About those Kennedy Kards

The now poignant Kennedy Kards deck was published in early 1963 when the public infatuation with JFK had been revitalized by his statesmanship in the Cuban missile crisis of October 1962.

JFK was the Jack of Hearts, First Lady Jackie the Queen of Hearts, and Bobby Kennedy, the King of Diamonds.

“Long live the King, Queen and Jack,” proclaimed an informational card that came with the deck.

Within the year, the Jack of Clubs, Vice President Lyndon Johnson, would be president. Read more

The CIA’s presidential briefings before November 22, 1963

Veteran JFK researcher Bill Kelly asks a good question about the CIA’s media blitz at the LBJ Library in Austin Texas last week. Read more

‘LBJ’ casts its RFK

The cinematic riches of the JFK era seem inexhaustible.

Now comes word that “LBJ” has found its RFK. And, as it did with its casting of former first lady Jacquelyn Kennedy, the Rob Reiner-directed presidential biopic is turning to a relative newcomer to fill the role. According to Variety, Michael Stahl-David of “Cloverfield” and HBO’s “Show Me a Hero” has signed on to play former Sen. Robert F. Kennedy in Reiner’s film, which is scheduled to start shooting in New Orleans this month.”

Source: ‘LBJ’ casts its RFK, as presidential biopic preps for NOLA shoot this month | NOLA.com

LBJ talks to Jacqueline Kennedy

This call between JFK’s widow, Jackie Kennedy, and LBJ, took place about 10 days after President Kennedy’s assassination: via LBJ and Jacqueline Kennedy—Miller Center.

Before final Selma march, LBJ agrees JFK needed more protection

Today, March 21, 2015, marks the 50th anniversary of the final of the three historic Selma-to-Montgomery marches protesting voting discrimination in the South.

During the first march, held March 7, the nation was shocked as it bore witness to the unchecked brutality Alabama state troopers unleashed upon peaceful marchers. The violence resulted in 2,000 U.S. troops joining 1,900 members of the Alabama National Guard to keep the peace during the final day of protest.

But in the lead up to that day, President Lyndon Johnson had to lobby Alabama Governor George Wallace to call up the National Guard. In this March 18, 1965, phone call, Wallace insists that state authorities could handle the situation, while allowing that he couldn’t promise that “nobody’s gonna get hit by a rock.”

He uses the JFK assassination to make his point (begins at the 11:00 minute mark):

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Crumbling consensus: Warren Commission staffer recants, says there was a JFK conspiracy

It has never been any secret that many serious people at the top of the U.S. government did not believe that President Kennedy was killed by a proverbial “lone nut.” But the elites of Washington have always preferred to ignore such suspicions.

Until today, when former New York Times reporter Phil Shenon reports in Politico magazine on the conspiratorial suspicions of one David Slawson, a retired law professor who investigated JFK’s assassination for the Warren Commission and now admits he got it wrong.

Slawson’s views are not unprecedented in elite power circles of Washington. Far from it.

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What defenders of LBJ gloss over

Lyndon Johnson was a great American for working with Martin Luther King to secure passage of the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act in 1964-65, as depicted in the movie Selma. So say historian David Kaiser and former Cabinet official Joseph Califano. Yet It is no contradiction to note that Johnson could also be a crude and mean SOB, as Philip Nelson reminds us.

Johnson and FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover, Nelson writes in OpEdNews:

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LBJ and ‘Selma’: Who gets it right?

Civil rights legislator

According to historian David Kaiser, writing in TIME,  “the portrayal of Lyndon Johnson and his role in the passage of the Voting Rights Act [in the movie “Selma”] could hardly be more wrong. And this is important not merely for the sake of fidelity to the past, but because of continuing implications for how we see our racial problems and how they could be solved.”

But, according to author Philip Nelson, Selma gets LBJ dead right. Writing in Op-Ed News, Nelson and  right-wing political consultant Roger Stone assert:

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Why the Warren Commission got scared of Castro

The Warren Commission didn’t get scared if Fidel Castro because of Lyndon B. Johnson’s chilling warning to Chief Justice Earl Warren about rumors that “if not quenched, could conceivably lead the country into a war which could cost 40 million lives.” Read more

Crowdsourcing JFK: Madeleine Brown debunked

In response to my call for crowdsourcing Madeleine Brown’s story about Vice President Johnson attending a party the night before the assassination of JFK and saying the Kennedys would never embarrass him again, I received no information to corroborate Brown’s story.

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Crowdsourcing JFK: The Madeleine Brown story

Is Madeleine Brown’s story true and verified?

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