Tag Archive for Gerald Posner

Practicing tolerance in the Age of Trump

Mark writes:

“Obviously Jeff I was objecting not to your self promotion but yet another insinuation that anyone who didn’t vote the way you did is a racist.”

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If you don’t know much about the JFK story, try ‘Before History Dies’

Before History DiesJacob Carter, millennial author, wants his generation to know and care about the JFK assassination story. The result is  “Before History Dies,”  an introduction to the debate over the causes of JFK’s death via interviews with thoughtful people who hold diverse opinions on the subject.

They include: Anthony Summers, David Talbot, Dan Hardway, Marie Fonzi, Dale K. Myers, Max Holland, Judge John R. Tunheim, and Gerald Posner.

I’m not unbiased because I am interviewed too, and because Carter is the social media manager for JFK Facts and a friend. Nonetheless, I have to say this is not just an excellent introduction to the JFK story. Its a model for people of any age for how to think about the JFK story: with humility, tranquility, and courage.

When did Lee Harvey Oswald decide to shoot President Kennedy?

An LP recording of Oswald’s appearance on a New Orleans radio program in August 1963.

I know a lot of readers will reply, “Never.” I hear your cries. Please bear with me.

Since I can’t quite rule out Oswald as a gunman (lone or otherwise) on November 22, 1963, I’m trying to understand what his motivation might have been if he did fire a gun that day.

I ask because I have always found it significant that it is hard to establish Oswald’s whereabouts at the moment of the fatal gunfire. Why wasn’t he outside waving or watching the president of the United States in the flesh? He was very interested in politics. He talked about Kennedy. He told George de Mohrenschildt on occasion that he admired JFK, and other times said he was “just another politician.” He had never seen a president in the flesh. So why did he pass on the chance?

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A history professor’s letter to The Economist

David Gibbs of the University of Arizona: JFK assassination; “Case not so open and shut.”