Tag Archive for Abraham Zapruder

Zapruder’s grandaughter on the damage of conspiracy theories

Earlier this week an utterly false and unfounded conspiracy theory, spread by right-wing fake news artists, about a Washington pizza parlor caused a deluded man to investigate with a gun and fire a couple of shots before he was subdued. Fortunately no one was hurt.

The incident prompted Alexandra Zapruder, granddaughter of the man who filmed the JFK assassination, to proclaim  There Are No Child Sex Slaves at My Local Pizza Parlor.

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JFK: the truth about the first shot

While single-assassin theorists Max Holland and Luke Haag have an ongoing feud over whether the first shot fired at President Kennedy hit a street light mast, or simply hit the street, the strong probability is that both are wrong.

The vast majority of witnesses who saw President Kennedy’s reaction to this shot described a reaction consistent with his being hit by this shot.

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In ‘Twenty-Six Seconds,’ Alexandra Zapruder talks about her grandfather’s film

The film that would come to bear his name “represented a trauma for our grandfather,” Alexandra Zapruder writes. “It was a source of pain for the Kennedys. It was a reminder of crushing disappointment and abandoned plans for my parents’ generation. It was a burden. It was an intrusion. It was a serious and complicated responsibility.”

Source: ‘Twenty-Six Seconds,’ by Alexandra Zapruder – San Francisco Chronicle

 

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JFK: The Parallax View

Zapruder Nix compared

On November 22, 1963, two bystanders, Orville Nix and Abraham Zapruder, filmed the presidential motorcade in Dealey Plaza. They both captured the same moment after Kennedy was shot: Nix from afar (top) and Zapruder from close-up (bottom).

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Where did the most famous JFK assassination film come from?

A 26-second home movie taken of the assassination of President John Kennedy on November 22, 1963, has become one of the most famous pieces of film ever. There are countless versions on YouTube, viewed by tens of millions of people.

Where did this amazing imagery come from? Is it an authentic depiction of the assassination of a U.S. president?

To answer such questions, I sought out a man who could answer them better than almost anyone: Richard Stolley, a former editor at LIFE Magazine, the immensely popular photographic magazine of the 1960s.

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Missing witnesses: two African-Americans on the grassy knoll

Grassy knoll aftermath

This photo, taken about 30 seconds after the assassination of JFK, shows a Dallas policeman running toward the so-called “grassy knoll” where two young black people were having lunch.

A half-century ago, two young black people in Dallas found themselves eyewitnesses to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy — yet their voices have never been heard. Indeed, a half century later, even their names are unknown.

This young man and woman were sitting on the spot famously dubbed “the grassy knoll” on November 22, 1963. They had a front row seat for a key moment in 20th century U.S. history: the murder of a popular liberal president.

 

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Doug Horne zooms in on the Zapruder film

This just in from Doug Horne:

As seen in ‘Parkland,” Abraham Zapruder filmed JFK’s assassination.

First, I want to thank Jeff for posting this interview (without yet watching it) in spite of the fact that he has always been skeptical about the Zapruder film’s supposed alteration (which I believe really did happen, for a host of reasons). This speaks well to his attitude about evidence; i.e., his willingness to consider new evidence and to follow wherever it may lead, and to permit and even encourage open debate, rather than suppressing uncomfortable or opposing opinions expressed by others. Thanks, Jeff, for supporting the scientific method.

Second,  some of the comments in this thread following the video reveal that others are simply not as familiar with this material as I am, or that they may not have fully paid attention during the interview. I hope the points I make below are useful to anyone who watches the video: Read more

Geraldo Rivera changed America

(THE VIDEO REFERRED TO IN THIS PIECE HAS BEEN REMOVED FOR TECHNICAL REASONS)

Last year, Chris Vogner, movie critic for the Dallas Morning News, reminded us how the first broadcast of Abraham Zapruder’s film of JFK’s assassination on ABC TV in March 1975 changed American popular culture.

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JFK on film: the cinema of assassination in 2013

The assassination of President Kennedy was, among other things, a seminal event in the history of mediated imagery.

From the moment Abraham Zapruder captured the gunfire that killed the president to Olvier Stone’s 1991 hit “JFK”, to the present when Hollywood still seek to explore, exploit, and explain November 22, 1963, projected film has been a key–perhaps the key–to the way we visualize and understand JFK’s death. Read more

Abraham Zapruder as the director of American history

New Republic film critic David Thomson on “The Film that Took Over History:”

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