Play ball: Obama and Castro at the ballpark


The somewhat extraordinary final day of President Obama’s historic visit to Cuba was eclipsed by news of the attacks in Brussels, First there was the  joint Obama-Castro news conference in which the Cuban leader actually had the novel experience of having to answer freely asked questions. Then there was the overlooked story that those notorious communist sympathizers at Google have agreed to provide the country with cheap and fast Internet, confirming fatuous Newt Gingrich’s point that President Obama is a suspected traitor, or something like that. Finally, there was a feel-good photo op: a baseball game between the Cuban national team and the Tampa Bay Rays, which Obama described accurately as, well, “somewhat extraordinary.”

Also unheard in U.S. media: how much Cubans appreciated what Obama is doing:

Restaurant waiter Víctor Aguilar told the Guardian it was unusual to see Castro asked about human rights.  “It’s good, really good. Cuba needs a free media,” said the 21-year-old, who hopes to go to the US for the first time later this year. “It’s a change and we need a change.”

2 comments

  1. Neil says:

    President Obama represented the US well

    I’m proud of him

  2. Fearfaxer says:

    The MSM is REALLY going out of its way to paint Obama as disengaged and negligent in his duty for having kept to his schedule. Listening to Morning Joe on Sirius Radio this AM was a disgusting experience, especially when the cadaverous Rudy Giuliani compared his actions on 9-11 to Obama’s yesterday. Not mentioned by anyone was the fact that on 9-11, Rudy’s emergency “bunker” (which wasn’t even a bunker but an office complex in one of the WTC towers “the Bunker In The Sky”) was unusable, and that the police and firefighters couldn’t communicate adequately because one of these first responder forces was using a communications system that was incompatible with the other. And that his communications system had been forced on them by Giuliani because it one of his big campaign contributors was involved with it.

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