Don Adams RIP: an FBI agent who didn’t buy the official theory

Don Adams, FBI agent

Don Adams, whose career as an FBI agent spanned 22 years, never really bought the official line of his own employer: that Lee Harvey Oswald, acting alone, assassinated President John F. Kennedy.

Adams, who died on June 14 at age 83 in Akron, Ohio, eventually wrote From an Office Building with a High-Powered Rifle (Trine Day, 2012), in which he argued that “the FBI’s investigation was compromised from the top down, beginning with FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover.”

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Pro-secrecy judges prove the need for JFK Secure Drop

The recent lamentable decision of the U.S. appellate court suppressing an ancient CIA report on the Bay of Pigs highlights the important of Operation Secure Drop.

What’s that?

It’s JFK Facts’ effort to find the Edward Snowden of the JFK story.

The Freedom of the Press Foundation is offering a software package called Secure Drop, which they call an “open-source whistleblower submission system for journalism organizations.” Read more

Sen. Richard Russell, the first dissenter

 Speaking of “Six insiders who suspected a JFK plot,”

Len Osanic’s Black Op Radio drills down on the story of Insider #4, Georgia Senator Richard Russell, a conservative defender of racial segregation and a member of the Warren Commission.

Russell’s biographer dubbed him “the first dissenter” in the  JFK assassination story.

Watch:

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‘Even paranoids have real enemies’

From the always-interesting John Simkin:

“There is a great book by Kathryn S. Olmstead (Professor of History at the University of California, Davies) called ‘Real Enemies: Conspiracy Theories and American Democracy, World War 1 to 9/11′ (2009).” Read more

Top 5 JFK Facts stories in June

The best-read JFK Facts stories in the month of June were: Read more

A new frontier in JFK research

A sample from the JFK Timeline Project

I’m excited about the JFK Timeline Project, even if I don’t fully understand it.

I’m excited because, as I said in Dallas last November, the JFK research community needs to up its collective game, get into the 21st century, and exploit the information technology that is transforming our lives. Easier said than done.

But thanks to Brian Castle, a programmer extraordinaire and self-described “n00b” when it comes to JFK, we have a work in progress: a website that seeks to harness the power of computing to generate new insights about the events of November 1963.

Here’s how Castle put it in an email:

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Sign the petition asking Archivist David Ferreiro to enforce JFK Records Act

With U.S. Archivist David Ferriero inviting and then ignoring public comments calling for declassification of all JFK assassination records, its time to sign Bill Kelly’s updated Change.org petition to free the JFK files.

Under the JFK Records Act, Ferriero has responsibility for enforcing the JFK Records Act — and he’s not doing it.

Here’s the story:

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A traveling JFK exhibition

jfk35.com is traveling exhibit of the private collection of F. Nicholas Ciacelli featuring over 350 original items fromt President John F. Kennedy
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Letters to Oswald: hoax or evidence?

On January 17, 1964, FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover wrote to J. Lee Rankin, the general counsel of the Warren Commission, on the evidence compiled as Commission Document 295: four letters postmarked in Havana that suggested or alleged that the assassination of President John F. Kennedy was a contract killing undertaken by Lee Harvey Oswald under the direction of an agent for Fidel Castro named Pedro Charles.

Hoover concluded it was “some type of hoax, possibly on the part of some anti-Castro group,” since the FBI Crime Lab found that the same Remington No. 10 typewriter had been used to prepare all four letters:

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Top official: CIA secrecy around JFK records is ‘ridiculous’

A top U.S. government official said Thursday that the CIA’s continuing secrecy around 1,100 documents related to the assassination of President Kennedy is “ridiculous.” Read more

ONI Investigator said Oswald files were withheld

Bill Kelly highlights the 1997 account of ONI Investigator Fred Reeves who wrote that the Marines Corps compiled reports on Lee Harvey Oswald that have never been made public.

Missing witnesses: two African-Americans on the grassy knoll

Grassy knoll aftermath

This photo, taken about 30 seconds after the assassination of JFK, shows a Dallas policeman running toward the so-called “grassy knoll” where two young black people were having lunch.

A half-century ago, two young black people in Dallas found themselves eyewitnesses to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy — yet their voices have never been heard. Indeed, a half century later, even their names are unknown.

This young man and woman were sitting on the spot famously dubbed “the grassy knoll” on November 22, 1963. They had a front row seat for a key moment in 20th century U.S. history: the murder of a popular liberal president.

 

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Credible witness: Bill Newman’s story

One perennial question people have about the JFK story is, Who do you believe? One credible witness is a man named Bill Newman. He was there, about 15 feet from JFK, when the gunfire rang out. His testimony is important. Read more

21 JFK cops who heard a grassy knoll shot

Grassy knoll aftermath

A cop runs toward the grassy knoll on November 22.

Strange but true:

At least two dozen, and perhaps as many as four dozen, of the witnesses to the assassination of President Kennedy in November 1963 thought at least one gunshot came from in front of the presidential motorcade, a claim rejected by the Warren Commission and most U.S. news organizations..

Richard Charnin has proposed a statistical proof of a shot from the front.

Another way to think about the matter is to review the eyewitness accounts, especially those of people with crime scene training.

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6 Washington insiders who suspected a JFK plot

Jackie Kennedy’s private thoughts about Dallas

Defenders of the semi-official theory of JFK’s assassination sometimes suggest that anyone who disagrees is deluded or dishonest. Dale Myers and Gus Russo have dubbed the benighted souls “the conspirati,” a term intended to convey disdain for those allegedly emotionally needy or intellectually incompetent people who doubt the claim that one man killed JFK for no reason.

The problem with this trope, alas, is the facts. There were plenty of astute observers of American power in 1963 who rejected the official theory of a “lone nut” and concluded President Kennedy had been killed by his enemies.

Here are six six U.S. government insiders in 1963 who suspected a JFK was killed by a conspiracy.

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