Judge Tunheim on CIA’s ‘inaccurate representations’

There is a body of documents that the CIA is still protecting, which should be released. Relying on inaccurate representations made by the CIA in the mid-1990s, the Review Board decided that records related to a deceased CIA agent named George Joannides were not relevant to the assassination. Subsequent work by researchers, using other records that were released by the board, demonstrates that these records should be made public.

Judge John Tunheim, former chair of the Asssasination Records Review Board (ARRB) and Thomas Samoluk, former deputy director of the ARRB.

2 comments

  1. Alan Dale says:

    Relevant to the long history of CIA’s “inaccurate representations,” the concluding chapter of Bill Simpich’s new book State Secret: Wiretapping in Mexico City, Double Agents, and the Framing of Lee Oswald is now available for reading online here at MFF.

    http://www.maryferrell.org/wiki/index.php/Featured_State_Secret_Conclusion

    The book is completed. Its focus is about the impersonation of Oswald in Mexico City. This final chapter covers Bill’s thoughts on who framed Oswald and killed the President. Rather than sell the book, Bill is asking for donations to Mary Ferrell. Leads for good radio shows are also appreciated – He wrote it, now he has to let people know it’s there.

    In the final chapter, subtitled Only Justice Will Stop a Curse, State Secret takes a hard look at suspects and “persons of interest” in the assassination, as opposed to the cover-up. The discussion of the role of the Secret Service, the near-pristine “magic bullet” found by a stretcher at the hospital, and JFK’s autopsy illustrates some ways to think about the distinction between assassination planners and cover-up actors. The chapter also suggests that the NSA’s ability in 1963 to listen to foreign leaders, access nuclear weapons codes, and obtain details on presidential protection were the crown jewels of US intelligence. These state secrets had to be protected from public view.

  2. Wow, that’s amazing he said that. When you read something like that it makes you want to work harder at being a JFK assassination researcher.

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