What Fidel Castro said about Oswald

“Because we have to presume that the enemy is constantly trying to send his agents in here, and that is why a lot of measures are implemented. A visa is not granted to just anyone who requests it, we need to know their background very well. That is why our officer rejected his application.”

From Our Hidden History (H/T David)

 

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From the Author of Our Man in Mexico
Comes a Detailed Investigation of
 CIA operations in Late 1963

CIA & JFKIn JFK & CIA; The Secret Assassination Files, Jefferson Morley uses on the record interviews of retired CIA officers and thousands of pages of declassified documents to sketch a granular account of the the inner working of the clandestine service on the eve of JFK’s assassination.

There is no theory here, only the facts about how certain named CIA officers monitored and manipulated the defector Lee Oswald as he made his way to Dallas.

From a five-star Amazon review:

“Highly recommended to all readers wanting to learn the truth on matters that the Government still fights to keep secret, some 53 years after the tragic event.”

JFK & CIA: The Secret Assassination Files,

One comment

  1. Arnaldo M. Fernandez says:

    On November 27, 1963, Castro said at the University of Havana:
    “It is very strange that a person at his very place of work, where he would be identified in five minutes, would carry out an act of this type”. Castro then inferred that “either this person is not guilty and was turned into a guilty person by the police, or this person (…) is perfectly prepared to carry cut the act with a promise he would escape”.
    The latter is the official position of Cuban State Security; the former, the position of those who thinks that Oswald was inserted by CIA officers in a piggy-backed operation on top of an anti-FPCC operation jointly run by the CIA and the FBI.

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