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The trouble with Nicholas Nalli’s paper on “Gunshot-wound dynamics model’ for JFK assassination

ZAPRUDER

This paper, published in the scientific journal Heliyon, represents an attempt to salvage Professor Luis Alvarez’s model of the gunshot that killed President Kennedy. Alvarez tried to explain the rearward recoil motion of Kennedy’s head, seen in Abraham Zapruder’s film, by what he called a “jetting effect.” Read more

CIA outs a living literary spy in the new JFK files

He was Richard Gibson, journalist, novelist, co-founder of the Fair Play for Cuba Committee, and cosmopolitan intellectual.

My story in Newsweek.

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After Trump’s big promise, 15,834 JFK files remain secret

Last October 26, President Trump was a happy tweeter:


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The JFK story according to seven U.S. presidents

Before Donald Trump made his false claim that Ted Cruz’s father once associated with accused presidential assassin Lee Oswald, six previous U.S. presidents had offered opinions about who killed JFK. Read more

The CIA is still protecting its spy who shadowed Martin Luther King

The CIA shadowed  Martin Luther King during his stay at a Miami hotel in July 1966 with the help of a spy whose identity still remains a secret a half century later.

The revelation is found in a 48-page file on King, portions of which were made public late last year, along with thousands of JFK assassination files.

President Trump has ordered all federal agencies to release the rest of their JFK-related files by April 26, a directive which covers the agency’s King file as well.

Trump’s order, issued last October, exempts from disclosure only “the names and addresses of any mentioned person who is still living.”  So if the CIA’s spy is deceased, his or her name is supposed to be made public this week.

MLK Surveillance

“Surveillance was a joint effort of IDEN A [the spy] and local ODENVY [CIA’s code name for the FBI],” according to a cable from the chief of the agency’s south Florida station. The surveillance took place in July 1966 when King and two associates stayed at a Miami airport hotel.

While the FBI’s surveillance of King is notorious, much less is known about the CIA’s interest in the civil right leader. Such eavesdropping violated the agency’s charter barring operations on U.S. soil.

The cable describes the spy as a “cleared and witting contact,” meaning he or she had a working relationship with the agency at the time. Approximately five lines of text that identify the spy have been blanked out in the document released to the National Archives in November 2017.

The spy listened in on King’s conversations from an adjacent hotel room for six hours.

“References were made to the Florida Gubernatorial Race, a trip to Bimini [an island in the Bahamas] and several miscellaneous sex experiences,” the cable reported.

After King and associates checked out the next day, the CIA’s spy searched their rooms, according to the cable. The informant found a phone message in a trash can asking King to call Harry Wachtel, a New York lawyer who served as King’s legal counsel.

The CIA’s spy claimed, inaccurately, that Wachtel was “an identified member of the Communist Party.” In fact, the FBI only had a report that Wachtel once had been active in the National Lawyer Guild, a leftist organization that some charged was a communist influenced.

The spy also found an envelope bearing the name of an unmarried woman who supposedly stay in the hotel room.

It seems likely that the CIA spying on King’s private life and is hiding the results. Nine of the next ten pages in the King file are completely classified, along with the spy’s name.

The memo supports the idea that the CIA worked with the FBI to obtain defamatory information about the civil rights leader less than two years before he was slain in Memphis on April 4, 1968.

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You can read the CIA’s partially declassified King file here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

JFK documents illuminate the death of a diplomat who asked too many questions about Oswald

James Angleton

James Angleton oversaw the surveillance of Oswald

Phil Shenon has a long piece in The Guardian excavating the sad story of Charles Thomas, a U.S. diplomat who investigated Lee Harvey Oswald’s actions in Mexico in the 1960s.  Thomas was rebuffed by top CIA officials, including counterintelligence chief James Angleton. Thomas was denied an expected promotion and later committed suicide.

The story illuminates a central mystery of the JFK assassination story but not quite in the way than Shenon proposes.

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Canadian TV on what we know now about Angleton and JFK

How CIA surveillance tracked Oswald on his way to Dallas

WaPo Oswald

CIA paid close attention

The most important revelations in the new JFK files concern the CIA (and possibly NSA) surveillance of accused assassin Lee Harvey Oswald.

A Senate investigator’s memo, released in December 2017, gives the exact date that the surveillance of Oswald began: November 11, 1959.

This is one of the most important JFK records released in the Trump era, so its details are worth understanding.

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JFK Files Watch: Will Gina Haspel destroy assassination records like she destroyed torture tapes?

Gina Haspel

Gina Haspel, document destroyer

As the April 26 deadline for release of the last of the JFK assassination files approaches. President Trump will be hearing from his new CIA director Gina Haspel on the issue of what can and cannot be made public.

What will Haspel say? Read more

JFK Files Watch: Will Trump enforce the law?

Will President Trump enforce the law when it comes to JFK assassination files later this month?

That’s the question the Mary Ferrell Foundation put to National Archivists David Ferriero in a March 12 letter. Read more

JFK Files Watch: With 22 days to go, these key files remain secret

As President Trump’s April 26, 2018 deadline for full disclosure looms, key JFK files remain beyond public view.

These files concern a subject the mainstream media coverage has shied from: the pre-assassination surveillance of accused assassin Lee Harvey Oswald from 1959 to 1963.

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JFK Files Watch: With 23 days to go, Trump and CIA face a dilemma

April 26 is the deadline for full disclosure of all of the government’s JFK files, according to this written order of President Trump. Or maybe it isn’t. Read more

After 15 years, my day in court with Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the CIA

Barrett Prettyman Courthouse

Home of Morley v. CIA.

When I sued the CIA for certain JFK assassination files in December 2003, I knew any litigation under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) was sure to take a long time.

It sure has. Read more

CIA to argue JFK lawsuit disclosures have no ‘public benefit’

Barrett Prettyman Courthouse

Washington DC courthouse where federal judges will hear oral arguments about the CIA’s JFK records.

On Monday March 19, a three-judge federal appellate court in Washington, D.C. will hear oral arguments about the “public benefit” of disclosure of CIA files related to the assassination of President Kennedy.

With the release of the last of the U.S. government’s JFK assassination files set for April 26, 2018, the judges have to pass judgement on a still-timely question: is there any public benefit from learning more about the events of November 1963? Read more

4 ways to fix the JFK files mess

What follows is a letter to David Ferriero, the National Archivist, from the Mary Ferrell Foundation, sponsor of the largest online collection of JFK assassination records.

The Foundation makes four recommendations for the improving the release of the last of the U.S. government’s JFK assassination files, now scheduled for April 26, per written orders of President Trump.

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