‘They will try to put the blame on us’

“Now, they will have to find the assassin quickly, but very quickly, otherwise, you watch and see, I know them, they will try to put the blame on us for this thing.”

Fidel Castro to French journalist Jean Daniel on November 22, 1963. From “When Castro Heard the News,”in The New Republic, Dec. 7, 1963.

 

Castro was right.

Within hours of JFK’s death on November 22, 1963, members of the Cuban Student Directorate, a CIA-funded organization based in Miami, linked suspected assassin Lee Oswald to Cuban president Fidel Castro. They were “the presumed assassins.” The allegation was published in a special edition of the group’s publication, Trinchera (Trenches) dated November 23, 1963.

This was the first JFK conspiracy theory to reach public print. According to declassified records, it was paid for by a decorated undercover CIA officer, the late George Joannides.

The leaders of the Directorate, also known by its Spanish acronym DRE, received $51,000 a month from the CIA, according to this April 1963 memo found in the JFK Library in Boston.

Within the CIA, the Directorate was known by the code name AMSPELL. The group was “conceived, created and funded by the Agency in September 1960 and terminated in December 1966,” according to a CIA memo, dated April 1967.

“Members were used through 1966 as political action agents for publishing propaganda … and producing radio propaganda and special propaganda campaigns,” the CIA memo states.

Castro’s intuition proved correct.

“They” — the U.S. government and the CIA — tried to blame him for killing Kennedy.

See:  Fidel Castro: ‘Oswald Could Not Have Been the One Who Killed Kennedy’ – Jeffrey Goldberg – The Atlantic.

2 comments

  1. TLR says:

    The ‘Strategy of Tension’ in the Cold War Period by Daniele Ganser (PDF)
    http://www.journalof911studies.com/resources/2014GanserVol39May.pdf

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